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Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Science & MathematicsEngineering · 11 months ago

Why does audio amp output drop at max frequency?

Update:

Is it due to internal reactance of the amp or inductive reactance of the speaker coils?

5 Answers

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  • 11 months ago
    Favorite Answer

    It's both. Amp makers know that there's no purpose in going beyond about 20 KHz, and so do the speaker manufacturers.

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  • 11 months ago

    A big reason is people can’t hear frequencies above 20khz. The higher the cutoff frequency the higher required power and complexity and cost. You don’t design in what is truly not needed

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  • 11 months ago

    Because its frequency band width drops sharply at the max.frequency point to avoid unwanted feedback oscillation.

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  • qrk
    Lv 7
    11 months ago

    In addition to other answers, it could be slew-rate limited.

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  • Anonymous
    11 months ago

    Because of the Gain Product Bandwidth of the amplifier.

    The gain multiplied by the bandwidth is some constant for the amplifier

    This means if you are looking for a high gain from a signal source

    then the bandwidth must be reduced to compensate.

    Another reason is that the output of the amplifier will have some capacitance which shorts out the higher frequency parts of the signal causing the output gain to roll off at -3dB/decade or thereabouts.

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