Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Cars & TransportationMaintenance & Repairs · 8 months ago

Can you make a Titanium engine block?

Say a titanium block for a Viper V10 engine or maybe a Lambo V12. That kind of thing would be both light as the original aluminum one and much stronger so that it could reliably work under high boost levels that only the Japanese iron blocks can survive.

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  • 8 months ago

    Besides the nightmare of machining it, it may not perform as well as you would expect. The smallest impurities can make it brittle (it is much less ductile then either aluminum or iron at best). Early titanium bicycle frames had a reputation for suddenly snapping.

    • Holey Mufflers
      Lv 7
      8 months agoReport

      n like magnesium, there's a virtual unstoppable fire risk. both materials have enough oxy molecules to burn in a vacuum. and ignite at, comparatively, low temps. like a simple spark

  • 8 months ago

    very xpensiv

  • zipper
    Lv 6
    8 months ago

    Sure can, but could you afford the car with one in it. Titanium is a very expensive metal!

    • FlagMichael
      Lv 7
      8 months agoReport

      Titanium itself is not shockingly expensive (about $26 per lb now) but machining it sure is.

  • 8 months ago

    You *can* do anything - but the cost alone would be prohibitive.

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  • 8 months ago

    Why? The engineers know how to build an engine block sufficient to the needs of the application. The block must support the crankshaft which is taking the firing impulses of the pistons and passing to transmission. But the block is not a wearing part . . . . that's the bearings, cams, piston rings, valves, cylinder walls etc. Making the block heavier or of more expensive materials is just waste. (And - I don't know this for sure - isn't titanium strong - but more brittle than iron, steel, alum, etc?)

    "Back in the day" - most engine blocks were iron. . . . . but Hudson made their blocks of high-chrome content alloy. SInce it was a flathead engine, that meant that the valve seats resisted wear better. And the piston rings wore faster than the cylinder walls. And where did spending more money than necessary take Hudson? Or Packard, or Peerless, or Pierce etc etc? !

  • 8 months ago

    You should consider the cost. It is super expensive.

  • 8 months ago

    Steel and aluminum alloys are just as durable as titanium for much less money. I've heard that Ferrari tried it in the 90s but I guess it never amounted to anything. Still, some cars do use titanium exhausts, connecting rods, and valves.

    Maybe one day we will see composite blocks.

    Also: "high boost levels that only the Japanese iron blocks can survive" is that a joke?

  • 8 months ago

    You won't gain anything. Really.

    Aluminium engines have steel or other alloy cylinder liners, so already have the required strength with minimal weight change.

  • 8 months ago

    No, sorry I cannot. I don't have the technical skills required to do so.

  • :;
    Lv 6
    8 months ago

    Yeah it would be expensive because its hard to work with

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