Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Arts & HumanitiesTheater & Acting · 1 year ago

How much training/lessons do soap actors have before they get a job in the industry?

7 Answers

Relevance
  • Cogito
    Lv 7
    1 year ago
    Favorite Answer

    An actor is an actor - what roles they get depends on what they audition for and what they win.

    No actor is 'just' a soap actor.

    And as soaps are regular, paid work, those roles are very sought after and hard to get.

    Almost all actors have trained in acting, singing and dance for approximately seven years, and had at least five years of stage and film experience. Most have attended a degree-level three-year course at university or (in the UK) a top drama school.

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • John P
    Lv 7
    1 year ago

    It depends....... There is never a universal answer to that sort of question.

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • 1 year ago

    My HS classmate, was a lead in "Where the Heart Is" a soap opera on CBS during the 1960s. He played the part of an unscrupulous MD (aren't they all in the soaps).

    Throughout HS he had the lead role in all the school musicals (I played in the pit orchestra). That was three musicals in all.

    He went to college and received a BA in the arts, i.e., acting, before hitting the treads in NYC. So it took four years of training while in school.

    While he was a struggling out of work actor, he lived in a subsidize tenement for $75 a month (this was back in the 1960s). And he waited on tables for real money.

    After countless auditions he landed the MD part and was on that show for several years. That first real break occurred about ten years after graduating from HS in 1954.

    My wife and I visited him whenever we were in town. He shared over a meal one time that all the actors on that soap earned $250 per appearance...no matter how many lines you had. So it paid to be written into the episodes for each day. His role was written in several times a week on average.

    We kind of lost touch with him and then several years later he showed up in a semi-pro showing at a place called Westminster near San Francisco. We reconnected and stayed in touch ever since. After Westminster he did the Fantastiks as its director in San Francisco. Directing was one of the things he learned while in college (it's worthwhile in the arts to have more than one skill).

    After that he played M. Firmin in the Phantom of the Opera for thirteen years with a road show. Whenever the road show came to San Francisco, we got together to catch up on what we each had been up to.

    Then he got a real break when they asked him to play the same part on the Broadway Phantom in NYC. He was with that group playing that M. Firmin role for another thirteen years. I used to joke with him that after 26 years playing the same part he might finally memorize all his lines.

    So the short answer for you, it took my HS classmate ten years training after HS before he finally could make a living in acting in a soap opera.

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • 1 year ago

    They are actors first, and soap actors only if that's the way their career happens to turn.

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • How do you think about the answers? You can sign in to vote the answer.
  • 1 year ago

    There’s no magical number of years of training. And there are a lot more actors who want to be on a daytime drama then there are jobs, so some actors may have a ton of training and still not get a job.

    Like most other production companies, daytime dramas hire actors who have demonstrated they have the talent, training, experience and reliability to work at a professional level. In the US, these actors will be represented by agents and will be members of the SAG-AFTRA actors union. Like in any other industry, networking and relationships with the casting directors who cast daytime drama are important too.

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • Anonymous
    1 year ago

    Soap actors are actors. Unless they're A-list, actors don't get to pick their roles, they audition for anything they can and fit: TV shows, movies, indies, theater, commercials, etc. If you limit yourself, no agent will want to represent you. Agents make money when you book a job. This is a BUSINESS, it's not about the actor.

    Anyway, to answer your question, while there isn't a specific amount, it takes about 7-10 years not just of training (from a top-quality acting school! In addition to workshops and such) but also of low-level experience (student and indie films and community theater, etc.), and landing plenty of leading roles and winning awards, as well as dancing and vocal lessons and other skills. All of this goes into your resume. In addition to that, it takes learning and understanding the business side.

    No legit agent will even consider taking you on as a client without a strong resume. And without an agent, you can't go to auditions for professional work, they are not open to the general public. If and when you get an agent, they would have to have great connections in the industry so that casting directors approach them when they cast for specific roles, for specific projects. So then, the agent goes over their client database and submits the clients that may fit those roles. Out of those, the casting director will invite to audition only a handful. The handful will take several rounds, each time a handful of the handful will get a callback, till the production narrows down the casting options. Out of hundreds or thousands, 1 will win the role (or a different one they didn't audition for). These are all highly-experienced and highly-trained talented actors. The competition is that fierce.

    On average, an actor will win 1 role every 100 auditions they're *invited to*. Those 1 roles will mostly be small ones, on minor productions, including things no one's ever heard of. For higher chances of getting cast to a national TV show, like a soap opera, one needs not only the right looks, but also plenty of *professional* experience. So, in theory, it could even take 30 years to get that kind of role. However, for 99% of professional actors this will never happen at all. 99% of professional actors don't get more than a few days of work per years at best. In small roles, on small productions. You'd be lucky to get 1 good role, let alone a few.

    Other than that, most actors continue training throughout their entire career. They always look to improve and learn new skills. So, basically, they never stop training.

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • Anonymous
    1 year ago

    Most actors spend 3 years at acting/drama school. Competion is fierce to get into the best establishments. Competition is even more fierce for acting work.

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
Still have questions? Get your answers by asking now.