Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Entertainment & MusicPolls & Surveys · 8 months ago

Was the burning down of the Notre Dame one of the biggest tragedies in your life?

111 Answers

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  • Anonymous
    8 months ago

    Though tragic nothing can come close to the horrors perpetrated at Andersonville

  • 8 months ago

    OK, first: Notre Dame was not burned down. Its' spire and part of its' upper inner walls were destroyed, and a great amount of centuries-old artworks were damaged. Yes, it was severely damaged, but not destroyed. There's hope to rebuild it. The French President managed to fundraise 900 million Euro within 24 hours of the fire.

    But yes, the burning was sad. I was sad to hear about it. I really wanted to go visit it.

  • Cousin
    Lv 6
    8 months ago

    Hardly. Cernunnos himself told me right there it was going to happen so to warn the priests. So I DID which just seemed to piss them off and probably irritate Aubrey who never got me. But 25 years on I am glad to see they took my advice and had scaffolding at the time, because I felt like that at least maybe helped hold up the stonework. And I told them about rescuing the art and I see that they did get the crown of thorns out.

  • 8 months ago

    No, but it is sad.

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  • Zheia
    Lv 6
    8 months ago

    Not really, but it did come as shock to see it burning on the television news. But the Soviets razed a lot of cathedrals and temples to the ground, and the Chinese are bulldozing mosques in the western part of China around Kashgar. ISIS have destroyed a lot of ancient monuments. These are deliberate acts in an attempt to erase a culture.

  • 8 months ago

    No, although it was a sad event or anyone who loves art and architecture and the iconic City of Lights, Paris. You don't have to live there to appreciate it. I appreciate stars as well.

    I think it is ironic that this kind of money couldn't be coughed up for poor people or hunger or disease control, but a building to praise an imaginary being and his "mother." It's pretty wasteful.

    • Dimple
      Lv 7
      8 months agoReport

      I’m not going to say Hes imaginary. But he is probably shaking his head and saying, “people are dying of hunger..morons”

  • 8 months ago

    No, because it doesn't affect me even one iota.

    Not to say that it isn't a tragedy. It's just not a tragedy for me.

  • 8 months ago

    It didn't even rate as 'sad'. Fires happen. Buildings that get burned down can usually be rebuilt. Why should that building rate as more tragic than if my house burned down? Now THAT would be a fairly major tragedy in my life.

    I shed no tears for the event in Paris. I was unmoved by it, just as I was unmoved when Yorkminster (a Protestant Cathedral in England) went on fire with a lightning strike in 1984. That was an immense drama because the lightning struck right after the archbishop had spoken ungodly things in public. That blaze was just like the one this week in Notre Dame. Despite Yorkminster being rebuilt, there are large areas that never were, such was the damage. So bear in mind that I was equally unmoved by a Protestant Cathedral going up in flames.

    I feel no concern for such buildings, when millions of people are sleeping rough, or in tin shacks, or in refugee tent cities. Notre Dame houses relics of ‘the true cross’ and ‘the crown of thorns.’ All the dismay is about art-works, architecture and history. In fact, it’s disgusting that, already, vast sums of money have been pledged to restore Notre Dame. It’s sickening because the planet may reach tipping point with climate change shortly after they rebuild it. Something like this shows clearly what people prioritize - outward appearances - buildings - status symbols. No, not a single tear will fall from my eyes, just as none fell for the burning of Yorkminster.

  • 8 months ago

    No losing colleagues and friends in Sandland during a religious war was by far..

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  • 8 months ago

    In terms of cultural tragedies, I'd say. Anyone who's been to Paris knows how magnificent that church is. Losing Notre Dame would be like losing the Mona Lisa, Mount Rushmore, or the White House in terms of cultural significance. But, there are also tragedies with the loss of human life that are far worse.

    • David
      Lv 7
      8 months agoReport

      Jesus doesn't care about that filthy pile of rocks.

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