T asked in Science & MathematicsEngineering · 8 months ago

Does an overrunning clutch bearing exist such that the one side remains overrunning no matter what?

Does an overrunning clutch bearing exist such that the one side remains overrunning no matter what, and is driving the other. The driven side rotates at the same angular momentum until any slight opposing torque is apparent- at which point it disengages allowing the overrunning region to continue spinning. For instance a flywheel driving a shaft. As soon as the shaft displays any opposing torque it disengages with the flywheel, allowing the flywheel to continue its rotation.

7 Answers

Relevance
  • Anonymous
    8 months ago

    Your use of the word "bearing" is confusing.

    You are asking about a "sprag".

  • 8 months ago

    In every overrunning clutch I have worked with, the overrunning side will not overrun if the drive side won't let it. What are you really asking?

  • Anonymous
    8 months ago

    Yes, in a starter. Also the drive to some sidecars. A differential has one.

    On an ORC, one side is always dominant; the other freewheels and if it exceeds drive RPM, it then does not load the drive side. That is the purpose of an ORC. As said, not a "clutch" at all, no friction discs to wear.

    What is your application?

  • 8 months ago

    Sounds like you're asking about a very common sprag clutch AKA sprag gear .

    Its certainly nothing new.

    I have no idea why its often called a clutch as there is no friction material involved.

    Its all done with rollers that run up a ramp & jam or run down a ramp & roll freely.

    Maybe this wiki description will help make the sprag principal of operation clearer.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sprag_clutch

  • How do you think about the answers? You can sign in to vote the answer.
  • 8 months ago

    The pressure plate is warped.

    • Anon
      Lv 5
      8 months agoReport

      Motorcycles, except Gold Wings, don't HAVE pressure plates. Friction discs and steels and a set of springs. Or, one diaphragm spring. Much like the clutches in an automatic tranny.

  • 8 months ago

    WTF are are asking about?

    A slipper clutch?

    • Anon
      Lv 5
      8 months agoReport

      Just Answer it best you can or don't answer it.

  • Tom
    Lv 7
    8 months ago

    ok

Still have questions? Get your answers by asking now.