Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Education & ReferenceWords & Wordplay · 8 months ago

Was "Axe" really the original English pronunciation of "Ask"?

cus my gram told me that

21 Answers

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  • 8 months ago

    it hails from western ireland,still used to this day,origin= the saxon infinitive

    'axen'

    in use today,a lot of peeps in ireland the US, get consonant order screwed up,,et cetera,becomes excetera,,escape becomes excape

    talkin 4 years post grad,plus 3 years business schrools,,,a whole pile of these------------------>excetera,nucyuh ler,as per,true facts true history,past history,prior plans,prior history,future plans,various and sundry,excape,point n time,genral consensus,concensus of opinion,genril consensus of opinion. ( 'gen/rll' that is how bad word raconteurs make it sound) ,outer perimeter, loose lose,lossed lost,choose chose,,preboard prepay prequalify,prepay,preorder,preregister,regester, we'll,well,your,you're , would of,libary, to,too close proximity,general consensus,disorientating,nope nope

    obfuscate becomes obfiuscate

    • bluebellbkk
      Lv 7
      8 months agoReport

      It doesn't 'hail' from western Ireland. It 'hails' from a much older form of English, where the original verb was 'aksian'.

  • 8 months ago

    No, she is wrong. It s just a lazy way of speaking, used extensively in the USA.

    • bluebellbkk
      Lv 7
      8 months agoReport

      It is still used extensively in the USA and in some dialects in the UK, but its ORIGIN was indeed 'aks', not 'ask'.

  • John P
    Lv 7
    8 months ago

    In certain parts of the British "ask" was pronounce as "axe" - but not universally. There are many words in English which sound different even today in different parts of Britain.

  • 8 months ago

    False

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  • zipper
    Lv 6
    8 months ago

    An AXE was a tool to cut wood or use in battle to kill an enemy with: Ask was a word used by the Ordinal People of England, and I have no idea what it meant in that early tongue!

  • 8 months ago

    Yes, from the Middle English 'aksian'. It appears that 'aks' was standard pronunciation until the 1600s.

  • Zirp
    Lv 7
    8 months ago

    Apparently, the two lived side by side until the 1600's

  • Mike
    Lv 7
    8 months ago

    It's axiomatic.

  • 8 months ago

    ah, no. you can look up such things in old fashioned, paper dictionaries. They showed the derivation of words -- ask apparently came from the Old Saxon word "escon" which meant to demand.

    [the Saxons were a series of Germanic tribes from what is now northwestern Germany and Denmark who crossed the North Sea and conquered much of England about the seventh century AD -- and brought their language with them -- replacing the earlier tongue of the Britons -- who spoke a Celtic language which, by the seventh century had been admixed with the Latin language of the earlier Roman conquerors of England.]

    Source(s): grampa
  • 8 months ago

    False.

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