Possible to learn to play guitar only with videos and books without classes? any such experience?

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  • Anonymous
    1 year ago

    It's possible, but it would be easier for someone to teach you in person. I've been playing guitar since I was 15, and I'm 33 going on 34 (I also play other instruments such as bass guitar, keyboard, and drums). I couldn't afford formal lessons, as I grew up in poverty. It was a miracle that I was even able to own any musical instruments, because there's no way I can afford them without help. I was a natural drummer. Played drums on and off since I was 10. Always wanted to learn how to play the guitar, but I was afraid I couldn't learn (fear of it being too complicated). While jamming with some friends when I was 14, the one who was playing the bass guitar let me try it out. He showed me an easy blues riff. I had various friends that were teaching me how to play. One of my cousins, over Christmas break when I was 15, showed me a few power chords (A5, G5, F#5, F5). My late grandfather showed me some regular chords. I was self taught on the synth keyboard. (I'm running out of room)

    Source(s): A friend of mine, who I attend church with, taught me the pentatonic scales and lead guitar riffs and solos. So, yes, you can learn on your own. But it is much easier for someone to come along side and teach you. If they are friends, they might teach you free of charge. When I was a teenage boy, formal music lessons were $20 for one half-hour. I'm a grown man now, and I'm not sure if the rate is the same or if it's higher.
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  • 1 year ago

    Yes, it is possible. Give yourself time on regular basis.

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  • Anonymous
    1 year ago

    Perfectly possible. I'm self taught from books and the "Youtube university", and I'm a proficient player, and even shred a little.

    However, this also depends on how technical you want to be. I'm a bit sloppy and trashy, which fits my style of music where expression is the most important thing, but probably well-taught, academic guitar players would frown at some of the things I do. I mean, if you want to take your guitar playing to hyperspeed one day, if you aspire to be the next Satriani, maybe being self taught there's a risk that you get along the way "vices" in posture that can hurdle you later on...

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  • Anonymous
    1 year ago

    There are lots of good players from my era (and lots of not so good players - like me) who are self-taught so it would be silly to say it's not possible. I learnt, in the 1970s, to begin with, from books. There were no DVDs, no internet, no You Tube and no tab.

    I never thought it was the best way to learn and I know that with lessons from a good teacher I'd have learnt faster and been a far better player (although a teacher wouldn't have helped my indolence!). The world is full of people of my generation who “used to play the guitar” which meant they began learning and then gave up.

    I learnt “properly”, albeit slowly, from books that were written by people who were good players and good teachers. The books I used had been edited, corrected and proof read. EVERYTHING in them was correct and nothing was missed out because it was “too hard”. Nowadays, anyone can post a video or tab. Books, it seems to me, are dumbed down and assume that people are too stupid to cope with anything challenging.

    I'm surprised at the things that some people don't know; people who seem quite competent players. They can play all kinds of things that OTHER PEOPLE have composed and that they have been shown, note by note, how to play, but they can't play “a twelve bar in A”. Nowadays there is simply TOO MUCH information, most of it wrong.

    I'd say that lessons from a good teacher are the best, fastest way to learn to play (they are the “short cut”that so many people seek). But, yes in theory, what you suggest is possible. Get a good beginner's book that does not contain pretty pictures and try to be “hip” and don't think that watching videos will teach you how to play. Look up Justinguitar (Justin Sandecoe - a great player and a great teacher.

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  • 1 year ago

    Since I learned that way, I would be a hypocrite to say it can't be done. Actually, when I started out in 1964, there were no videos. We only had books, sheet music, and records that we could slow down to catch licks. The other resource I had was other musicians to interact with.....and of course, a lot of luck.

    From my perspective 55 yrs later, I can tell you that it wasn't the best way to learn. Most people who self-learn give up in frustration or never progress beyond being "3-chord cowboys". Of course, you never hear about them, except in random conversation. "I used to play a little" or "I tried to learn once but gave it up" are very common responses when people are asked if they play guitar. Very few self-taught guitarists make it beyond the beginner stage, and those that do (and I'm including myself here) take much longer to become proficient. Also, if pressed deeper, most "self taught" guitarists would admit that they had a few informal mentors along the way.

    If you're considering trying guitar, examine your goals (and the odds of achieving them). Maybe you'll be happy learning a few chords so you can strum at sing-a-longs. Maybe you want to memorize a couple of hot licks to impress people. If that's your goal, videos and books will probably work. If you actually want to learn to play guitar competently, lessons will get you there a lot faster and with a much lower failure rate.

    • Mamianka
      Lv 7
      1 year agoReport

      Words Of Wisdom, Tommy. And they come from you so often, that we all just use the abbreviation.

      WOW

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  • Anonymous
    1 year ago

    Many professional guitarists are self taught. All you need to do is be able to tell if you are producing something that resembles music.

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  • zeno
    Lv 7
    1 year ago

    Just play guitar tab and make notes of what

    Parts of songs resonate with you. Guitar one

    Has lots of good songs and there is a guitar

    Tab song website with lots of songs. Learn

    By doing it. There is no short cut only steady

    Playing and learning step by step until you

    Put together your own material.

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  • 1 year ago

    Yes, it is possible.

    But who knows how effective it will be.

    It is up to the person and their ability

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  • 1 year ago

    When I was a teenager I knew dozens of people who played the guitar. We were ALL self-taught. We learned from books and taught each other tricks. That's why guitar is so popular--you can teach yourself.

    Whenever you see someone on TV playing a guitar, look at their left hand on the neck. If their thumb is sticking up over the top of the fingerboard, they are self-taught. A teacher will teach you to put the end of your thumb up against the middle of the neck, to give your fingers more freedom and range. MOST popular and country/western guitar players do this.

    You start out learning chords (accompaniment). The hardest thing is gaining strength in your left hand, to pull down the strings. At first you can't practice more than 10 minutes at a time because it gets PAINFUL. (But you can do 10 min. several times a day.)

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  • Liar
    Lv 7
    1 year ago

    100% Absolutely. There's quite a few thousand courses on YouTube, along with any number of how-to guides that can be bought. You can even buy beginner guitars dirt-cheap that are marked so you can recognize where to place your fingers.

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