If distribution of matter in the universe is homogeneous and isotropic, how does that explain large scale clusters or voids?

Stuff like: The Clowes–Campusano LQG, discovered in 1991, is 630 Mpc across, and is marginally larger than the scale. The Sloan Great Wall, discovered in 2003, has a length of 423 Mpc and is also marginally larger than the scale. U1.11, another large quasar group discovered in 2011, is 780 Mpc across, and is two... show more Stuff like:

The Clowes–Campusano LQG, discovered in 1991, is 630 Mpc across, and is marginally larger than the scale.

The Sloan Great Wall, discovered in 2003, has a length of 423 Mpc and is also marginally larger than the scale.

U1.11, another large quasar group discovered in 2011, is 780 Mpc across, and is two times larger than the scale.

The Huge-LQG (Huge Large Quasar Group), discovered in 2012, has a length of 1.24 Gpc, and is three times larger than the upper limit of the homogeneity scale. However, the scales of the individual quasars of this structure do not have a chance correlation to each other, providing the evidence of the impossibility of this structure.

The Hercules–Corona Borealis Great Wall is more than eight times larger than the scale, greatly exceeding the homogeneity scale. In accordance with this, the structure would still be heterogeneous as compared to the other parts of the universe even at the scale of the "End of Greatness", thereby putting the cosmological principle into further doubt.

Genuinely curious as I don't know much about astrophysics and find it hard to discern what to believe or not to believe when I read about the subject
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