I have Haemophilus influenzae?

More than a week ago I started having upper repository tract symptoms such as sore throat and than a cough that lasted a few days. My boyfriends little cousin was coughing and I was hanging out with her and I assumed thats where I picked it up. After a Nasal Lab test it came out positive for Haemophilis influenza but neither the doctors or lab could confirm if it was HIB or the b strain that is dangerous. Since my respiratory symptoms have been gone for over a week now my doctors assure me I don't need an antibiotic but if I'm carrying a bacteria isn't that dangerous for my health? I've read this bacteria can cause meningitis and invasive blood disorders. I'm sure i was vaccinated as a baby but I'm 21 now. I'm not sure why doctors are so non chalant about this. IT IS A BACTERIA and it CAN cause problems. Like am I supposed to wait until something horrible happens. I't doesn't help that suddenly a couple days ago I started getting diaherra and now burning in my stomach and nausea and stomach pains and I went from already thin to very thin. Could be food poisoning or I could be slowly dying from bacteremia( blood poisoning)does any one know more about this disease? I don't want to wake up with meningitis suddenly or get blood poisoning

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  • 2 years ago
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    Take a deep breath. If you are going to be hysterical about it then at least read up on it. I am a dinosaur in the lab because I have been around many years and have seen many cases of H. influenzae as the vaccine has been a very good success story where hardly any infections are being detected today. It gets harder to teach somebody else what it looks like if there isn't much going around.

    The reason why a vaccine was invented is beause most of the serious cases involving meningitis and sepsis were children and you aren't a child. It only gets serious when you have a condition that hinders your immune system. I suggest you read up on this.

    "H. influenzae, including Hib, disease occurs mostly in babies and children younger than 5 years old. Adults 65 years or older, American Indians, Alaska Natives, and people with certain medical conditions are also at increased risk."

    https://www.cdc.gov/hi-disease/about/causes-transm...

    You are twenty one and not a child and that is why doctors are so non chalant about that. Another reason for that is that it is called an "opportunistic" pathogen and not a true pathogen. What that means is that the mere presence does not denote disease. It isn't like Ebola or the plaque where detection of such an organism is always treated. Normal immunity keeps such opportunist infections in check.

    The vaccine is to protect the body from invasive systemic disease and not for non-sterile body sites like the nose. If you had a positive blood culture with that bug then rest assured you would have been treated for it. Localized infections that don't cause pneumonia, meningitis or sepsis or Mickey Mouse infections. The vaccine does not prevent superficial infections that don't cause disease. It is also questionable that the sore throat can be attributed to the H influenzae as it wasn't even a throat culture but a nasal swab and another body site. That might be fine to determine if you are a carrier of that bug but that doesn't constitute as evidence for the symptoms as being caused by that bug. Lots of people have Strep pneumoniae growing in their throat but that doesn't mean they have pneumonia of even if they had pneumonia it doesn't necessarily mean simply by having it in your throat that it is the cause for the pneumonia.

    As for your GI symptoms then rest assured that it is unrelated to H influenzae. It might be related to some other bug or bugs that are causing your symptoms. The HIB is a red herring.

    You were vaccinated for HIB and it is not by any stretch any major player in todays infections. It has been one big success story. It has been practically wiped out. I can tell you what hasn't been wiped out and is going strong but I won't.

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