Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Science & MathematicsPhysics · 11 months ago

Can light travel from equator to the North Pole? Since light travel through a straight line, and the surface of the earth is not flat?

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  • 11 months ago
    Favorite Answer

    No. Not directly. A radio at the north pole can't receive a signal from the equator, unless it bounces off a satellite. That is why we have communication satellites.

  • 11 months ago

    No a light beam travels in a straight line. A light beam shined from the equator will ont reach either pole unless it is reflected by some object above the Earth like for instance a satellite.

  • goring
    Lv 6
    11 months ago

    The earth has a curvature of 1/6 x10^-6 per meter.Light can actually bounce off the atmosphere but would attenuate at the poles

    • 11 months agoReport

      HELL IS REAL.

  • Vaman
    Lv 7
    11 months ago

    It will not. We need a reflectors in the sky. This is done by satellites. Light is also scattered. This may send very a fraction of light to the north pole.

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  • Dixon
    Lv 7
    11 months ago

    Not visible light but low frequency radio (which is essentially light) can refract and reflect off regions of the sky such that it can get to places that are not line-of-sight.

  • 11 months ago

    If you took a large sphere (beachball sized) and placed an led on the surface of the equator of the sphere, you could easily see that the light would not be seen at the north/south pole because of the curvature of the sphere. Gravity can bend light, but in this question you are asking the simple notion of light arcing on it's own.

  • NO!
    Lv 6
    11 months ago

    I suppose if the light is strong enough then yes.

  • Photons travel in a straight path, provided that they don't pass near anything massive. The answer to your question is a hard, "No." Even if there was nothing blocking the path, the light would only be visible for so far and then it'd be gone.

  • Mmm J
    Lv 7
    11 months ago

    Sure... via fiber optic cable and appropriate optical repeaters... or bounce it off the mirrors on the moon left by one of the Apollo trips...

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