Jack asked in Arts & HumanitiesBooks & Authors · 11 months ago

What are some books you recommend to read? Why?

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  • Andrew
    Lv 7
    11 months ago
    Favorite Answer

    "Brighton Rock" by Graham Greene. Because everyone should be able to point to a solid example of a really good, well-crafted novel that's also really exciting.

    At least one of Raymond Chandler's big three - "The Big Sleep", "Farewell, My Lovely" and/or "The Long Goodbye." Because his style is often emulated, but nobody has ever done it better. Great stuff. Cracking dialogue, wonderfully rich characters. Eminent style.

    Cormac McCarthy's "The Road." Easily the finest novel of the 21st Century. Profoundly sad, hauntingly beautiful, incredibly bleak, but so moving that it will stay with you long after you've finished it. It will make you want to give your da a big hug, and if you've got kids, it will change your life. And I mean that.

    Something by Bill Bryson. He's just brilliant. Tireless researcher, side-splittingly funny, I can read his stuff all day long.

    'King Lear.' Not the best Shakespeare play, but a good introduction. All about family, the most important thing in life.

  • Verity
    Lv 7
    11 months ago

    "Nomadland" by Jennifer Bruder

    A look at one of America's "shadow communities", people who were left behind by the recession and

    who live in cars and vans, travelling for work wherever they can find it. Their ingenuity is incredible.

  • 11 months ago

    Fiction

    One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest by Ken Keasy - A novel with a cast of flawed characters that prove that truth is totally subject to how one perceives the world.

    The Power by Naomi Alderman - A newer book about power and how it corrupts everyone it touches

    Different Seasons by Stephen King - 4 very different novellas A classic Gothic Victorian tale, a teen bonding quest, a wonderful story about hope and redemption and a straight on thriller about the ability for people to be corrupted by learning more of the world than they can handle.

    The Doomsday Book by Connie Willis - A Time Travel saga set during two plagues centuries apart.

    Watership Down by by Richard Adams - A classic quest story with rabbits, sounds silly but isn't a deeply compelling story.

    The Hobbit By JRR Tolkin - A quest adventure and IMO his best work.

    The Handmaiden's Tale by Margaret Atwood - A dystopian tale even more relevant today than when it was written

    Non Fiction

    The Devil in The White City or Dead wake by Eric Larsen - Two books that are told from dual viewpoints Devil is about the architect of the 1891 World's Fair and one of America's most prolific serial killers both working at the same time and place. Dead Wake is about the two ship captains at the sinking of the Lusitania

    My Dark Places by James Ellroy - A very personal story by one of Ameirca's best crime writers. His search for answers around his mothers murder.

    The Season of the Witch by David Talbot - A contemporary History of San Francisco from the summer of love to the AIDS crisis

    Buried Dreams by Tim Cahill - One of the best books about the psychology of serial killers I've read

    Yes I Can by Sammy Davis Jr. - A memoir of a life on stage from vaudeville, thru the jim crow era and beyond. A history of performance and race in America.

    Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee by Dee Brown - A comprehensive history of the genocide of

    America's native peoples in the early 19th century.

  • Anonymous
    11 months ago

    Code of Conduct by Brad Thor if you like intelligent contemporary thrillers.

    The Path of the Higher Self if you've questions about the meaning of it all.

    In a Sunburned Country for humor.

    The Great Divorce for insight.

    101 Things Every Young Adult Should Know for practical insight.

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  • 11 months ago

    Third Millennium by Paul Myer

    Source(s): Real narrow story line for fictional drag.
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