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radio/cell phone towers question?

I've noticed that radio/cell phone towers blink white during the day and blink red at night on the very top of these towers. What is the reason they do this? Why don't they blink the same color all the time?

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  • Jerry
    Lv 7
    1 year ago
    Favorite Answer

    Dual lighting is a system in which a structure is equipped with white strobes for daytime use, and red lights for nighttime use. ... The FAA-mandated flash pattern is middle, top, and bottom to provide "a unique signal that pilots should interpret as a warning that catenary wires are in the vicinity of the lights."

    the blinking Aviation Warning Light situated at the very top. Whether it’s a skyscraper, an electrical tower, or a radio antenna, once a structure tops 200 feet, the FAA gets involved.

    There are very strict guidelines as to the candle power of the beacon. Either red or white light is acceptable, but red is more commonly used in areas where aircraft regularly fly at night. The lights must be connected to an appropriate control device (photo cell, timer, etc.) so that the brightness is adjusted appropriately and automatically in relation to the sky illumination. In the event of a power outage or burned-out bulb, the local FAA office must be notified within 30 minutes, and repairs must be made promptly. The warning lights must be observed and logged daily, unless they are equipped with an automatic alarm system that detects any failure.

    From a web search and I am a pilot.

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  • Tavy
    Lv 7
    1 year ago

    Red is a warning sign at night.

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  • Anonymous
    1 year ago

    lfizppss

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  • 1 year ago

    It's so planes don't hit them. The white provides better visibility on the day.

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