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Recommend a good book?

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So as English is not my native language sometimes I feel really bad seing how people know how to use this really extravagant words, or simply words different than those commonly used while we speak. I want to be able to do that and expand my vocabulary. I know any book could possibly help, but do you know of any in specific that would be a good option? (Please don’t say the dictionary lol)

Also, I feel very ignorant of this going on at the government level, or about laws and other cultures. I want to read a book that would male me less ignorant of this, just anything no matter how small, but that i could enjoy reading at the same time since I get easily bored.

I appreciate the help, I’ll give five stars to best answer.

13 Answers

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  • 1 year ago
    Favorite Answer

    If my goal were to increase my vocabulary, I'd be reading literary fiction in English. I'd read what interests me so it's not a chore but a delight even though it might challenge me.

    The one I'm slowly plowing through, City on Fire, has unfamiliar words galore. I keep a list of words I intend to learn and although I'm only a quarter of the way through this book, I've added at least a hundred new words.

    I'd also subscribe to Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day in email, and if I were on twitter, I'd be following people who tweet about words and language, including Merriam-Webster (whoever does their feed is funny, too), Grammar Girl, and whatever else I could find.

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  • 1 year ago

    SHORT STORIES BUT TRUE by SABINO ROSA is wonderful and you can find it even like e-book

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  • Spike
    Lv 7
    1 year ago

    MAYBE these books for your future reading, when you have the time.

    Firefly Lane: A Novel by Kristin Hannah

    Fly Away: A Novel by Kristin Hannah

    Wonder by R. J. Palacio

    Empire Falls by Richard Russo

    The Little Coffee Shop of Kabul (originally published as A Cup of Friendship) by Deborah Rodriguez

    Not as Crazy as I Seem by George Harrar

    Everything I Never Told You by Celeste Ng

    Show Me All Your Scars: True Stories of Living with Mental Illness by Lee Gutkind and Karen Wolk Feinstein

    Don't Call Me Nuts : Coping with the Stigma of Mental Illness by Patrick Corrigan and Robert Lundin

    The Company: A Novel of the CIA by Robert Littell

    The Devil of Nanking by Mo Hayder

    The Joy Luck Club by Amy Tan

    The Spy Who Came for Christmas by David Morrell

    Santa Cruise: A Holiday Mystery at Sea by Mary Higgins Clark and Carol Higgins Clark

    The Lilies of the Field by William E Barrett

    The Thief Lord by Cornelia Funke

    How It Ends: From You to the Universe by Chris Impey

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  • Anonymous
    1 year ago

    Narnia it’s all about plants and space lions and a wartrobe that’s a vortex through space

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  • Anonymous
    1 year ago

    For fluent English prose, "West with the Night" by Beryl Markham (Hemingway's favorite non-fiction book, btw);

    for humor and interest, Bill Bryson's "In a Sunburned Country" (and other books by him);

    for light British humor and romance, good vocabulary, P. G. Wodehouse ("The Code of the Woosters," for example);

    for interesting character development, C. S. Lewis' "The Great Divorce" and "That Hideous Strength;" "101 Things Every Young Adult Should Know;"

    for government insight, "Dr. Mary's Monkey;" "The Soulless One;" "The Closing of the American Mind;" "Ethnic America" by Sowell; "Animal Farm."

    For general interest, "Understanding Yourself" by Mark Prophet; "The Kindness Challenge" and "For Couples Only," both by Shaunti Feldhahn; "The Yoga of Nutrition;" "Autobiography of a Yogi" (has good vocabulary words, is easy to read).

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  • 1 year ago

    The legal profession has its own jargon, and is difficult even for fluent English speakers - it requires separate study. The same is true of the medical field.

    Comic books and graphic novels are usually written in the present tense, simple future and simple past tense. The vocabulary tends to be conversational, an excellent way to learn speaking and oral comprehension. Cartoons do the same, and I heartily recommend the very funny and political series Rocky and Bullwinkle.

    As for books, why not start with short works, like Animal Farm, The Lord of the Flies, The Old Man and the Sea, and so on.

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  • 1 year ago

    Try these two young adult reality fiction novels, Blades and Dangerous Days both by J. William Turner

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  • 1 year ago

    The best author of plain English is Ernest Hemingway. He wrote For whom the Bells Toll, Fiesta, The Old Man and the Sea won him a Nobel Prize.

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  • Andrew
    Lv 7
    1 year ago

    Any book geared towards the description and analysis of culture or law is naturally going to contain some heavy vocabulary. Those are not topics for new language learners. Before you can get into things like that, you're going to have to build a foundation in the language itself. I'd recommend starting out with some light fiction. You'll likely encounter a lot of words you know, some you don't, and you'll gain a greater understanding of the culture of English-speaking countries and their people. Why not pick up a book of Ray Bradbury short stories like "The October Country"? The stories are fun, the language isn't too dense, and reading them will afford you the opportunity to explore a host of topics. They're perfect for older kids or teens if they're native speakers, and probably easy enough for you to understand and appreciate. I still read and enjoy them now, decades after I was first introduced to them.

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  • 1 year ago

    One book is not going to teach you everything. Just read many different things. If you want to understand how the world works, read the news and history books. To learn how to use fancy words, read decent newspapers and good fiction, and get a dictionary to look up words you don't understand.

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