Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Arts & HumanitiesPhilosophy · 1 year ago

Why does some philosophy question things that are comoon sense?

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  • 1 year ago
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    I think it's because people either read too much into a question or too little. For example, I see the question posted here ad nauseam: "What is the meaning of life?" Some may consider this a deep philosophical question. I think it's irrelevant. You can contemplate the unanswerable until the rapture and never arrive at a conclusion. I don't attempt to answer questions such as why we are here. I accept the fact that we are, and try to make some sense of the world as I find it. Sometimes philosophic questions remind me of the two fables, The Emperor's New Clothes and the Gordian Knot. Sometimes people see things that aren't there, and sometimes they complicate the obvious in what I regard as a pseudo intellectual exercise. I find both ludicrous and inane. I'm sure this is why practical people often find philosophy foolish and worthless.

    In a personal aside, I often smile at the thought that most philosophers are men. I don't for a moment think it connotes a superior intellect. I think it illustrates the fact that historically women were practically slaves to their husbands, and while the lazy bums were off contemplating deep questions like how many angels can sit on the head of a pin, their poor wives were raising the kids , cooking, cleaning, and doing all the non-philosophical things that allowed their husbands to sit around discussing what was the meaning of life. Too bad they didn't ask their wives!

  • 1 year ago

    because common sense is not common

  • Anonymous
    1 year ago

    Dunno innit.

  • P
    Lv 7
    1 year ago

    Either a less than obvious intent or a substandard spell checker. However if I correctly interpret your question, which is one of them, education is so focused that it largely disregards lifes essentials like common sense and teaching students to drive

    Consequently, what is blindingly obvious to some eludes others. Philosophy seeks to promote understanding, asking questions is one way to do this

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  • 1 year ago

    What "things that are comoon sense" are you referring to? I suppose the reasons differ from thing to thing.

    Some possible reasons:

    If we accept things that are supposedly common sense without thinking about them, we run the risk of overlooking mistakes that might not be readily apparent.

    Not everyone agrees upon what constitutes common sense.

    Doing so can serve as an intellectual exercise.

    Thinking critically about one thing can lead us to another.

  • Gordon
    Lv 6
    1 year ago

    misread your question, or maybe you edited it.

    SKEPTICISM: glorious skepticism. It's common sense that the more slaves you have the happier you will be. But skepticism makes us question ourselves, the world, everything and every idea within it. This allows us to overturn immoral popular positions and discover ways of thinking that are better and new. Skepticism helps us to reject bad ideas, and examine ideas that we otherwise wouldn't even be aware of, because they are common sense.

  • Anonymous
    1 year ago

    Philosophy is thought in search of better things, better life.

    Questioning common sense makes sense if it ---> better.

    However, if questioning authority or common sense is solely woolgathering, then it's psychologism. Wittgenstein's phrase "meaning-blindness" applies to woolgathering; he enjoyed discussing common sense questions with common sense people, noted word definitions clarified discussion (re such woolgathering as "word games"), and advised his philosophy grad students to learn a helpful profession or vocation.

    • Gordon
      Lv 6
      1 year agoReport

      A tool to aid thought, rather than an end into itself

  • Anonymous
    1 year ago

    Philosophy is bullshyt....end of discussion, I can see its charm to impressionable stoners in college...but its all testicles

    • Gordon
      Lv 6
      1 year agoReport

      not downing you, but science is a result of philosophy--a way of seeing the world that owes itself to skeptics like Socrates and Francis Bacon. Democracy is also a philosophy. So are populism and anti-intellectualism. I agree that philosophy is bull, but it is also inescapable

  • 1 year ago

    To keep things interesting, and to keep you thinking.

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