Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Arts & HumanitiesHistory · 1 year ago

What happened to Korean War and WWII draft dodgers?

Update:

What happened to Korean War and WWII draft dodgers who refused to show up for the draft? Did anyone ever see what happened to the draft dodgers personally? What happened if they were drafted then refused to do what the commanding officers told them to do?

12 Answers

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  • 1 year ago
    Favorite Answer

    It's appalling that some dodged the draft in World War Two. I lied about my age to enlist.

    I do have to say that there are some regrets. I now agree with Patton that we were fighting the wrong enemy. We should have taken it to the dirty Zionists and Russian commies.

    Well, I am wring a book about this and will discuss it.

  • 11 months ago

    Nothing

  • 1 year ago

    Don't know.......wasn't there at the time..........don't know what they did or where they hid out.

  • 1 year ago

    Conscientious Objectors as they were known, were given non combat duties, clerical, medical, transportation etc non combat missions, but; many served in this capacity as well. Draft Dodgers were during Vietnam. Many skipped to Canada, some like Cassius Clay became Muslim and as we saw he became Mohamed Ali. ELVIS served his tour of duty in Germany, Clay could have fought under the ARMY title, but; chose to be a chicken and claim a religious belief as a cause not to be registered.

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  • Nick
    Lv 7
    1 year ago

    They would have been put in jail, like the cowards they were. People with a moral objection to war can still serve in a nonfighting role, such as a medic

  • 1 year ago

    At this point, most have died of old age.

  • Albert
    Lv 5
    1 year ago

    Wasn't there a Presidential pardon for all of them? Was it for both? Wasn't that more a Vietnam thing due to "how popular" that conflict was.

  • Bill-M
    Lv 7
    1 year ago

    Today = Nothing.

  • 1 year ago

    Those who were caught faced up to five years in prison. The USA ceased enforcement in 1973 when conscription ended.

    Note that for both WW2 & Korea there were mechanisms to allow people to avoid service due to being a conscientious objector or to complete alternative service. Even those whose requests to avoid service were rejected had the opportunity serve as a Medic or other non-combat specialty rather than be a combat soldier.

  • Anonymous
    1 year ago

    Leo G. Black, 88, of Ennis, a Navy veteran who was active in many community organizations, died of natural causes Saturday 2010 at a Bozeman hospital.

  • Anonymous
    1 year ago

    RANGER SCHOOL!

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