In general, are stars whose temperature is over 10000 K less likely to have a planet that can develop lifes?

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  • Sky
    Lv 7
    1 year ago

    Any star can have any number of planets around it. For life to develop the planet has to be in the habitable zone around the star, the planet can't be too big or too small, it requires an atmosphere and very likely liquid water for life to develop, and it also requires enough time for the chemistry on its surface to bring together the molecules required for what we could define as life. If the star is too big it will burn through its fuel, and may go supernova, before life has a chance to even begin.

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  • Anonymous
    1 year ago

    They don't fission (gravitational compression) so they burn out faster, so there's probably not enough time for life.

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  • 1 year ago

    Our sample size of stars known to have planets that can develop life is precisely one.

    We can speculate on what factors affect the likelihood of developing life, but we can't even remotely claim to know.

    Those speculations may make sense based on what we understand of science, but they are still speculations.

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    For instance:

    Stars with higher temperatures generally have shorter lifespans, and so have less time for life to develop. But they ALSO have wider "habitable zones," and so have more space in which it can.

    We don't yet know whether those two factors weigh the same in the likelihood calculation.

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  • Athena
    Lv 7
    1 year ago

    We do not have enough information to say that at this time. We do not know if there is "life" on any of the planets we have found.

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