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Was our Sun and solar system formed by the molecular cloud left over by the death of a previous star and solar system before ours?

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  • 2 years ago
    Favorite Answer

    Previous stars, definitely yes. Previous planetary systems, perhaps not.

    The terrestrial planets would not exist were it not for stars that lived before the sun. The first two elements of the periodic table, Hydrogen and Helium, are commonly available in the universe. To form planets like Earth, however, we need heavier elements; and those are created in stars. Stars convert Hydrogen into Helium through process of nuclear fusion. When they run out of hydrogen, they begin to fuse Helium to make heavier elements, working down the periodic table all the way to Iron.

    Once a star begins to produce Iron, it no longer has enough energy to produce other elements. It reaches a point of saturation, begins to collapse on itself, and then goes supernova. In addition to dispersing all the chemical elements produced so far, the explosion also provides the energy needed to produce other natural elements all way up to Uranium.

    These chemical elements are the ingredients needed form planets like Earth.

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  • 2 years ago

    Yes

    And look how that turned out

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  • Anonymous
    2 years ago

    Yep. That slice of bacon you ate yesterday contained 27 atoms that were once a piece of snot in the nose of a playwright from that now-dead solar system who was a billion times more talented than Shakespeare and Beyonce put together.

  • spot a
    Lv 7
    2 years ago

    The answer to your question as asked is "No" but the basic idea is correct.

    Many different supernovae over the previous 8.5 billion years were necessary to scatter enough atoms and molecules to form the primordial cloud of dust and gas which our solar system formed from

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  • 2 years ago

    Probably several...

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  • 2 years ago

    Our solar system is thought to have formed from the debris and dust ejected from the nova/supernova of another (or others) no-longer extant star system(s), yes. There are many elements that are here on earth which can only form during such events, so it follows that at least part of this system has incorporated elements produced during the explosive destruction of another star.

    If you look into space and look at nebulae (the dust clouds left over from a supernova event), it will be apparent that many star systems are forming (recently formed) within those nebulae. We extrapolate that this system formed in a similar fashion to what we can see happening out there.

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  • someg
    Lv 6
    2 years ago

    It is still forming.

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  • Edwena
    Lv 7
    2 years ago

    That sounds about as silly as all the other explanations. The reason being is that you are being fooled to add layers of complexity from the pseudo-science and avoid the real question of origination. The "previous star and solar system" origination is green cheese.

    • spot a
      Lv 7
      2 years agoReport

      Did you get your "pseudo facts" from a single book which has been rewritten and edited hundreds of times? Did you read all the earlier books?

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  • Norman
    Lv 7
    2 years ago

    It must have included some recycled material from previous solar systems.

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    • CarolOklaNola
      Lv 7
      2 years agoReport

      The CORE of a massive star IMPLODES to form a black hole. It DIES NOT EXPLODE.. of fill up and explode. Only the OUTER layers of the star explode. WHY do SO MANY people always have their facts uncoordinated and their logic is TWISTED?

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