Would it be a wrong for me to take my child by force if a surrogate tries to keep it?

Let's say I have a child through GESTATIONAL surrogacy (where the surrogate ISN'T related to the child), the carrier decided she wanted to keep the child and the law supported her. In this scenario, would it be wrong to take my child by force and flee the country? Because I would do it if I was left with no choice.

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  • 2 years ago
    Favorite Answer

    It wouldn’t be wrong. What that surrogate is doing is wrong.

  • 2 years ago

    Need to know a laws https://surrogacyinrussia.com/

  • 2 years ago

    BEST ANSWER IS 100% WRONG.

    Taking the child is kidnapping, a federal crime. Without a DNA test, you don't know the baby is really yours. You have to go to court to enforce the contract and also prove your the bio-daddy.

  • 2 years ago

    Yes, it would be. Being raised by someone who is willing to break the law would not be in the best interest of the child, and frankly the child probably would be better off with the surrogate anyway. Although cases of surrogates refusing to terminate parental rights as the birth parent gain a lot of notoriety, the plain fact is that it is exceptionally rare. Plus a good number of those surrogate-keeping-the-baby stories are either the result of the surrogate realizing the intended parents are unfit and giving up the child would likely endanger them, the intended parents split up and the surrogate was also the egg donor which gave her claim to the child, or the baby has medical problems the intended parents just didn't want to deal with.

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  • LizB
    Lv 7
    2 years ago

    Yes, it would be. Being raised by someone who is willing to break the law would not be in the best interest of the child, and frankly the child probably would be better off with the surrogate anyway. Although cases of surrogates refusing to terminate parental rights as the birth parent gain a lot of notoriety, the plain fact is that it is exceptionally rare. Plus a good number of those surrogate-keeping-the-baby stories are either the result of the surrogate realizing the intended parents are unfit and giving up the child would likely endanger them, the intended parents split up and the surrogate was also the egg donor which gave her claim to the child, or the baby has medical problems the intended parents just didn't want to deal with.

  • 2 years ago

    Until the child is born and the mother terminates her parental rights, the potential parent is just that - potential.

    While the potential parent may believe that is his or her child, it is also possible it might be the child of the mother and her husband or boyfriend.

    Kidnapping is never an option.

    Most surrogates have no intention of keeping the child, so it's not a likely scenario.

  • 2 years ago

    Yup.

  • C
    Lv 7
    2 years ago

    In order to prevent the exploitation of surrogates (even though they do get exploited in developing countries) there's not a country I'm aware of where the child does not belong to the surrogate until it's born AND she surrenders it. You would be breaking the law, end of.

    I sympathise with the trouble you're having conceiving but you're being very selfish not to look at the bigger picture. Although extracting eggs is unpleasant the surrogate's very body is the one doing all the work. She is the one who bears all the medical risks of a pregnancy and it is her body that is flooded with maternal hormones. If she unwillingly lost the child she is the one who suffers the greater loss. Some things just can't be quantified in money.

    If you are so hellbent on having biological offspring and can't carry them yourself do the decent thing and find a surrogate in your own country, one who is not in a position of potential exploitation, one with whom you have a rapport, a real one. A surrogate is a human woman, not a machine and you have to be able to look her in the eye with a clear conscience. It should be an act of love and not financial desperation. Find the right woman and you won't have to turn yourself into knots wondering if the "machine" is going to rebel.

  • Pippin
    Lv 7
    2 years ago

    The contract would have clearly spelled out the rights and responsibilities of all parties in the transaction.

  • Mary
    Lv 7
    2 years ago

    If the law supports her, because in many cases the gestational carrier is considered the biological parent irrespective of who the genetic donor is, then taking the child is just treated the same as any other kidnapping,

    So sure. If you want to be a kidnapper, go ahead as that’s an internationally prosecuted crime.

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