Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Society & CultureMythology & Folklore · 2 years ago

Did adam have first wife before eve?

13 Answers

Relevance
  • Anonymous
    2 years ago
    Favorite Answer

    How many moms and dads does GANGSTER GHOST have?

  • 2 years ago

    Yes . She left him, because she would not allow him to rule her.

  • BMCR
    Lv 7
    2 years ago

    No he did not.

  • Anonymous
    2 years ago

    No Scriptural basis for this BS!

  • How do you think about the answers? You can sign in to vote the answer.
  • Anonymous
    2 years ago

    Not according to the Bible.

  • 2 years ago

    It is not actually in the bible, but it is in other texts.

  • Anonymous
    2 years ago

    Absolutely not

    He was very single when he meet her

  • Anonymous
    2 years ago

    No, Adam had a boyfriend. His name was Steve. God created Adam and Steve! LOL

  • 2 years ago

    Lilith (/ˈlɪlɪθ/; Hebrew: לִילִית‎ Lîlîṯ) is a figure in Jewish mythology, developed earliest in the Babylonian Talmud (3rd to 5th centuries). Lilith is often envisioned as a dangerous demon of the night, who is sexually wanton, and who steals babies in the darkness.[1] The character is generally thought to derive in part from an historically far earlier class of female demons (lilītu) in ancient Mesopotamian religion, found in cuneiform texts of Sumer, the Akkadian Empire, Assyria, and Babylonia.

    In Jewish folklore, from the satirical book Alphabet of Sirach (c. 700–1000 CE) onwards, Lilith appears as Adam's first wife, who was created at the same time (Rosh Hashanah) and from the same dirt as Adam—compare Genesis 1:27. (This contrasts with Eve, who was created from one of Adam's ribs: Genesis 2:22.) The legend developed extensively during the Middle Ages, in the tradition of Aggadah, the Zohar, and Jewish mysticism.[2] For example, in the 13th-century writings of Isaac ben Jacob ha-Cohen, Lilith left Adam after she refused to become subservient to him and then would not return to the Garden of Eden after she had coupled with the archangel Samael.[3]

    Evidence in later Jewish materials is plentiful, but little information has survived relating to the original Sumerian, Akkadian, Assyrian and Babylonian view of these demons. While the connection is almost universally agreed upon, recent scholarship has disputed the relevance of two sources previously used to connect the Jewish lilith to an Akkadian lilītu—the Gilgamesh appendix and the Arslan Tash amulets.[4] (See below for discussion of the two problematic sources.[5])

    In Hebrew-language texts, the term lilith or lilit (translated as "night creatures", "night monster", "night hag", or "screech owl") first occurs in a list of animals in Isaiah 34:14, either in singular or plural form according to variations in the earliest manuscripts. In the Dead Sea Scrolls 4Q510-511, the term first occurs in a list of monsters. In Jewish magical inscriptions on bowls and amulets from the 6th century CE onwards, Lilith is identified as a female demon and the first visual depictions appear.

    The resulting Lilith legend continues to serve as source material in modern Western culture, literature, occultism, fantasy, and horror.

    Samuel Noah Kramer (1932, published 1938)[10] translated ki-sikil-lil-la-ke as Lilith in "Tablet XII" of the Epic of Gilgamesh dated c.600 BC. "Tablet XII" is not part of the Epic of Gilgamesh, but is a later Assyrian Akkadian translation of the latter part of the Sumerian poem of Gilgamesh, Enkidu, and the Netherworld.[11] The ki-sikil-lil-la-ke is associated with a serpent and a zu bird.[12] In Gilgamesh, Enkidu, and the Netherworld, a huluppu tree grows in Inanna's garden in Uruk, whose wood she plans to use to build a new throne. After ten years of growth, she comes to harvest it and finds a serpent living at its base, a Zu bird raising young in its crown, and that a ki-sikil-lil-la-ke made a house in its trunk. Gilgamesh is said to have killed the snake, and then the zu bird flew away to the mountains with its young, while the ki-sikil-lil-la-ke fearfully destroys its house and runs for the forest.[13][14] Identification of ki-sikil-lil-la-ke as Lilith is stated in Dictionary of Deities and Demons in the Bible (1999).[15] According to a new source from Late Antiquity, Lilith appears in a Mandaic magic story where she is considered to represent the branches of a tree with other demonic figures that form other parts of the tree, though this may also include multiple "Liliths".[16]

    Suggested translations for the Tablet XII spirit in the tree include ki-sikil as "sacred place", lil as "spirit", and lil-la-ke as "water spirit".[17] but also simply "owl", given that the lil is building a home in the trunk of the tree.[18]

    A connection between the Gilgamesh ki-sikil-lil-la-ke and the Jewish Lilith was rejected by Dietrich Opitz (1932)[19] and rejected on textual grounds by Sergio Ribichini (1978).[20]

    The bird-footed woman in the Burney Relief

    Main article: Burney Relief

    Burney Relief, Babylon (1800–1750 BCE). Some scholars (e.g. Emil Kraeling) identified the figure in the relief with Lilith, based on a misreading of an outdated translation of the Epic of Gilgamesh.[21] Modern research has identified the figure as one of the main goddesses of the Mesopotamian pantheons, most probably Ishtar or Ereshkigal.[22]

    Kramer's translation of the Gilgamesh fragment was used by Henri Frankfort (1937)[23] and Emil Kraeling (1937)[24] to support identification of a woman with wings and bird-feet in the Burney Relief as related to Lilith, but this has been rejected by later sources, including the British Museum, which is in current possession of the piece. The terracotta plaque depicts a beautiful, naked goddess-like sylph with bird-like features who stands atop two lions and between two owls. Although once believed to be the actual image of Lilith, it is now thought to possibly represent Inanna, the Sumerian goddess of love, fertility, beauty, war, and sexual desire. The depiction of the nocturnal and predatory owls, however, have led many to believe the relief is an affirmation of Lilith’s role as a demon who flies about the underworld, delivering night terrors to those who sleep.

    "Lilith is said to have been the first woman in the world and was created by God at the same time as he created Adam. It is said that Lilith was then banished and rejected by God after it was found that she was stronger and more intelligent that Adam and she would not obey the commands of Adam. The character was not mentioned in the Bible to understand the origin of humanity as Lilith was said to go against the tradition of the church in that women must obey a man and women were in a lower position than men.

    The traditional Bible has gone through many religious filters to ensure that it loses some of the important sections and pieces. However, there is a part that has been left in it that suggests God created not only a man but a woman at the same time instead of later as it has been suggested in the Bible when the rib was taken from Adam.

    Catholic churches censored the apocryphal texts. Lilith had been a woman who had a character that was firm, and she was intelligent and seemed to be superior to Adam. However, Adam was more dominant in character and had a carnal appetite. In intimacy, Lilith demanded that Adam be on her, and she could be on him, but Adam refused.

    This was said to have caused conflict and so there was a separation of the two and Lilith was banned by God when Adam asked. The apocryphal book of Genesis states “Why should I lie beneath you? He asked: I was also made with dust, and therefore I am your equal … As Adam tried to force her to obey, Lilith, angry, pronounced the name of God, and left.” https://www.disclose.tv/lilith-was-adams-first-wif...

  • 2 years ago

    No, he did not. In some translations Isaiah 34:14 Lilith is mentioned, but in other translations Lilith is rendered "screech owl," "night creature," "demon" or something akin.

  • Anonymous
    2 years ago

    No.

Still have questions? Get your answers by asking now.