Why is British English So Redundant and Otherwise Strange?

Examples: In the move, "A Night to Remember (1958)," the second class couple, before leaving England, promises to send their relatives a wireless "from the ship." Just where else would they send it from? A crew member who spotted the Californian exclaimed that it was so many "miles"... show more Examples:

In the move, "A Night to Remember (1958)," the second class couple, before leaving England, promises to send their relatives a wireless "from the ship." Just where else would they send it from?

A crew member who spotted the Californian exclaimed that it was so many "miles" away, with heavy emphasis on the word "miles." Was there some uncertainty about the measure of distance?

Another crew member assured someone that the Carpathia should be here "any time now," which emphasis on the word "now." What does the word "now" add to the sentence?

In other contexts, the British will preface an assertion with "in actual fact." If a "fact" is not "actual" (i.e. true), then it is not a fact.

The British refer to an ordinary flashlight as a torch. What do they call a real torch?
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