How much does evolution affect humans?

The race deniers have lost a lot of battles. When anthropologists discovered africans and non-africans have been separated for 70,000 years it was a pretty big blow. Before that they said skin color changed over the course of around 10,000 years. Only it was 70,000. That would've been bad in and of itself, but... show more The race deniers have lost a lot of battles. When anthropologists discovered africans and non-africans have been separated for 70,000 years it was a pretty big blow. Before that they said skin color changed over the course of around 10,000 years. Only it was 70,000. That would've been bad in and of itself, but it became worse around 2007 when geneticists were able to sequence the human genome. And the first thing they found were different homologous clusters of DNA among different races. Now ancestry tests can tell you your exact race down to .01 of a percent. This one really hurt, because before there was "no biological basis in race, because I don't know what categories are, or the difference between coding and non-coding sequences are" - said the race deniers. But once we can accept that yes, evolution works in humans. Divergent evolution happened between polar bears and grizzly bears 70,000 years ago, which is almost the exact same duration non-africans & Africans have been geographically apart, until like the past 500 years or so. Now we're learning other languages and becoming more globalized, but before then they were more or less entirely separated groups. & if sociology is any guide, then Africans are not the most intelligent. Perhaps it's because of them evolving in a tropic biome for so long, which makes athleticism a much more important trait for natural pressures. In temperate biomes, alleles and genes linked to intelligence become more concentrated in that pop.
34 answers 34