Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Pregnancy & ParentingBaby Names · 3 years ago

do you regret naming your child what you named them?

i saw this article about parents regretting giving them some "cool" names & wondered how many other people regretted naming their child a certain name.

here's the article if you want to read it

https://nypost.com/2018/06/13/hipster-parents-admi...

16 Answers

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  • Anonymous
    3 years ago

    My youngest had a common name but over all - no I don't. Each childs name has a meaning to it or is honoring somebody.

    My first born, Irene Elisabeth, was named so because she was born just months after the Soviet Union collapsed. It was a great joy to political families across Europe and it brought about a sense of peace and Irene means peace. Elisabeth was my mother's name.

    Our second child is Alexander John, named after my father with Alexander and my spouses father with John.

    Our third child, Albert Victor, was named after my deceased brother and Victor is the masculine of my husbands mothers name.

    Our fourth child, Margaret Gabriella, was named after my husbands favourite sister and Gabriella means 'God's gracious'

    Our fifth and final child, Sophia Hazel, was named so because Sophia means wisdom and Violet cones from her eyes were the loveliest hazel eyes ever and the only one of her siblings to have hazel eyes. The others all have blue or green eyes.

  • GEEGEE
    Lv 7
    3 years ago

    I saw that article and found it to be interesting. It must be a chore to have to constantly correct people when they mispronounce or misspell your name. I moved to a new school in the 12 th grade and there was a girl named Mari, and I assumed her name was pronounced Mary. Apparently most other people did too. Apparently though it should have been pronounced Marie, and she had stopped correcting people ages ago. Yikes!

  • ?
    Lv 7
    3 years ago

    No, we gave both our kids simple traditional Dutch names. With traditional spelling. Not a X, Y, Q, pointless E or silent H in sight.

    The funny thing is that both English and 'unique' names (and names that are both) are so common nowadays, that many people have commented on how special their names are, exactly because they are traditional.

  • Anonymous
    3 years ago

    We named our son Austin 19 years ago. I love his name and his middle name is Tyler which I equally love. We made a good choice.

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  • Anonymous
    3 years ago

    I had a moment when I wondered if I had made a mistake with our second child. I never consulted "naming baby" type books and I never researched on the internet before deciding on a name. When we named our second daughter, our first daughter was just over four years old. We had asked her what she wanted us name the baby. She had two cousins that she loved and kept switching between the two names. We put the names together in a way that sounded good to us and we spelled it exactly as it sounded phonetically. We gave her a common middle name that we both loved just in case she would end up not liking her first name. We have had to spell our daughter's name repeatedly for several family members. We have also actually had to correct a few people on how they say it when they see it spelling. Several years ago, I finally searched her name and discovered that the name actually does exist and isn't just something we made up, so that made me feel a little better. The other thing that makes me feel better is that our daughter LOVES her name.

  • Anonymous
    3 years ago

    No because my husband and I choose timeless names not momentarily trendy ones. They also mean a lot to us so that also helps. Not being teen parents or having IQs in the low double digits also helps a lot in not choosing horrible names that one will regret or have harshly judged by those with at least average IQs and above.

  • 3 years ago

    I named my daughter "Jordan" after the Great Gatsby character Jordan Baker. (she was sort of evil but I liked the name)

    No one had that name at all, but within 6-7 yrs- everyone and all boys were named Jordan. It caused a bit of confusion, but I still don't regret the name. Now days there are buttloads of male and female Jordan's.

  • ?
    Lv 7
    3 years ago

    No

  • Anonymous
    3 years ago

    No because the names reflected our culture and values.

  • Anonymous
    3 years ago

    No, because I chose a very traditional name, which happens to be my husband's middle name and also a frequently-used name on my own side of the family.

    But I know a woman who named her son Kindness and her daughter Mellow. (She was sort of a hippy type back in the 60s and 70s.) The daughter has kept her name, but the son, who was called "Kin" as a child and teenager, changed his name to Kenneth in his 20s.

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