Anonymous

Friend keeps invading my personal space?

I have a friend who s been having trouble at home (his family fights constantly) and he s been trying to come over my house daily. However, it s coming to the point now that he comes over without even asking. If I tell him now s not the best time, he leaves for an hour then returns, refusing to leave and begging me for pity.

I do the best I can to try to make him feel comfortable as I understand his family fights so much. But... when he breaks into my room, computer, and fridge and takes everything he wants (he legitamately took my clothes and I am a girl), I feel likes he s going too far. He wants what he wants, and he doesn t take no for an answer.

He tries staying the ENTIRE day, and wants to sleep over my house every night he can (which makes everyone else in my house unhappy as well). He s not interested in me, but he s way too clingy for my liking, and I usually spend the entire day to myself so you can see how irratated this could get me. I m honestly thinking about telling him off, but I m just too passive of a person to do that. Does anyone have any advice for me?

4 Answers

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  • Anonymous
    3 years ago

    Tell him your family doesn't want him around anymore and he needs to find some place else to go. Get your parents to back you up.

  • 3 years ago

    A

  • 3 years ago

    Yeah this can be a tricky situation. You need to set some boundaries with him and that takes brutal honesty. You could blame your parents for setting new rules when and how often you can have friends over as a little white lie to ease the pressure he is forcing on you. Or you could just tell him the whole truth that you demand more respect, more time between visits. Also try to encourage him to make more friends so he can visit them too. He is far to dependent on you.

  • 3 years ago

    Give him the number of the Boys Town Hotline (800-448-3000) to call and speak to a counselor about what he should do about home.

    Tell him he can't keep coming to your house, and to think about whether he has a relative who could give him a place to go. Let him know that there is a penalty for housing a runaway, and while he may have a very good reason for not wanting to be home, it's time for him to ask for help - perhaps from Child Protective Services - rather than to keep coming over to your place.

    You could talk to your guidance counselor at school, if school isn't out yet, or call that hotline (or Childline in the UK) yourself. It's a difficult situation, but it does sound as if he has some mental issues, in addition to troubles at home. He needs help from social services, not just your family.

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