Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Arts & HumanitiesHistory · 2 years ago

Was the siege of jerusalem 70ce was the first military confrontation that had a death toll of over a million?

It is said that over 1.1 million died over a period of 3 years of violence, famine and diseases, because of the siege

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  • larry1
    Lv 6
    2 years ago
    Favorite Answer

    It was probably 2nd worst and 2nd highest death toll up to that time. When the Assyrians took Babylon (metro pop 1 million) they murdered far more in the 600'sBC. But Jerusalem in the 'Jewish Wars' (see Josephus) had to be second.

    Modern historians know that Jerusalem at the time was physically incapable of having more than 70,000, but under siege and with the overcrowding it was 100,000. The Romans by their own records massacred and tortured to death 70,000 (70%). In the rest of Palestine as the War dragged on 500,000-700,000 died. These totals (750,000-1,000,000) were at least 1/3 of all humans in the area of what's now Israel, Jordan, Lebanon, Syria.

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  • 2 years ago

    Julius Caesar claimed in his 'Commentaries on the Gallic Wars' that he had killed at least 1 million Gauls,so that would seem to be an earlier example of a 1m + death toll during a military campaign.

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  • Who
    Lv 7
    2 years ago

    dont be silly

    the population of jerusalem today aint 1million

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  • 2 years ago

    Numbers of Ancient wars are notoriously unreliable so you shouldn't take much notice of precise numbers.

    According to some early scholars King Xerxes invaded Greece with a million men which was clearly impossible from a logistical point.

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  • s
    Lv 5
    2 years ago

    Historians very much doubt that those kinds of numbers were involved, much less slain in the Greco-Persian Wars. By all critical measures it was a Persian victory, which is not so say that Xerxes did not incur large losses inflicted by Athens. Xerxes did not withdraw in defeat but, rather, left an occupation force and withdrew in order to avoid having the bulk of his forces to become trapped in Greece. It was not combat but infliction of starvation and disease that resulted in the majority of the Persian forces never making it back to their homeland.

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  • Anonymous
    2 years ago

    I would have thought he Gallic Wars conducted by Julius Caesar could easily have topped 1 million.

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  • 2 years ago

    The trouble is the phrase "it is said".

    There are no confirmed numbers, and no way to confirm them.

    I would hazard that Caeser's invasion and conquest of Gaul probably killed far more people than that, and that was much earlier in history.

    Not to mention that according to Herodotus, the Persian army which invaded Greece and was stalled at Thermoploae was 5,283,220 strong. And that army was defeated, so over a million must have died easily if we believe that number.

    And this was WELL before the crusades and the battle for Jerusalem.

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