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Kyle
Lv 7
Kyle asked in Politics & GovernmentPolitics · 3 years ago

What are the pros and cons of making Puerto Rico, the 51st state of the United States of America?

The residents are already US citizens, can join the US Military, and are a territory of the US. Residents can move freely from the island to the US as they wish. Why not just make them a state officially?

18 Answers

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  • ?
    Lv 7
    3 years ago
    Favorite Answer

    Everytime StateHood comes up on the Puerto Rican Ballot they vote it down because it would require all PR residents to pay Federal Personal Income Tax on all money earned. As it stands now they only pay it on money earned from sources outside of Puerto Rico.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Taxation_in_Puerto_R...

    The Commonwealth government has its own tax laws and Puerto Ricans are also required to pay most US federal taxes,[1][2][3][4][5][6][7][8] with the major exception being that most residents do not have to pay the federal personal income tax.[9] In 2009, Puerto Rico paid $3.742 billion into the US Treasury.[10] Residents of Puerto Rico pay into Social Security, and are thus eligible for Social Security benefits upon retirement. However, they are excluded from the Supplemental Security Income.

    The federal taxes paid by Puerto Rico residents include import/export taxes,[11] federal commodity taxes,[12] and others. Residents also pay federal payroll taxes, such as Social Security[13] and Medicare taxes.[14]

    Only certain residents of Puerto Rico are required to file federal income tax forms. According to the Internal Revenue Service:

    In general, United States citizens and resident aliens who are bona fide residents of Puerto Rico during the entire tax year, which for most individuals is January 1 to December 31, are only required to file a U.S. federal income tax return if they have income sources outside of Puerto Rico or if they are employees of the U.S. government. Bona fide residents of Puerto Rico generally do not report income received from sources within Puerto Rico on their U.S. income tax return. However, they should report all income received from sources outside Puerto Rico on their U.S. income tax return. Residents of Puerto Rico who are employed by the government of the United States or who are members of the armed forces of the United States also should report all income received for their services to the government of the United States on their U. S. income tax return.

    United States citizens or resident aliens who are not bona fide residents of Puerto Rico during the entire tax year are required to report all income from whatever source derived on their U.S. income tax return. However, a U.S. citizen who changes residence from Puerto Rico to the United States and who was a bona fide resident of Puerto Rico at least two years before changing residence can exclude from U.S. taxable income the Puerto Rican source income received while residing in Puerto Rico during the taxable year of such change of residence. [15]

  • 3 years ago

    We will have to add a star to every American flag everywhere. It will be a huge pro for the iron on patch companies.

  • Mark B
    Lv 7
    3 years ago

    It would add 2 Democratic US Senators and 1 Democratic Representative.

    About the only way it would happen is if Puerto Rico becomes a state and California splits into 2 states.

    Whenever it comes up for a vote in Puerto Rico it is split. Puerto Rico gains tax advantages and businesses have tax advantages by being a territory. There is also a relatively vocal contingent that wants to become an independent country.

    Depending on how the question is asked of the people that live there, you get 25-30% that want to be independent, 35-40% that want to be a state, and 30-40% that want things to stay the same.

  • Anonymous
    3 years ago

    Here's why it will never happen: because Republicans figure that the brown skinned Spanish speaking residents of Puerto Rico will vote mostly for Democrats

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  • Anonymous
    3 years ago

    In my opinion it should be independent. The Framers of the Constitution didn't plan for an empire. It was a union of states, not an empire of states ruling over territories. The territories were seen as eventually becoming states, due to British departure from the Old Northwest and then the Louisiana Purchase and the Mexican War.

  • 3 years ago

    We can't afford them. Puerto Rico has the largest percentage of non-workers compared to all the states.

  • 3 years ago

    That way they ?might? get more help but that is unlikely.

  • 3 years ago

    residents of Puerto Rico have yet to vote for becoming a state. Do they get to say what they want, or did you plan to run roughshod over their wishes?

  • 3 years ago

    We need to stay at 50. Let make PR a state but combine North & South Dakota. Let's be honest, there really just isn't enough Dakota out there to justify them taking up two states.

    Ideally we could swing a trade with Canada and give them West Virginia and Mississippi in return for British Columbia, but I don't think they're in the mood to deal after we stole most of their NHL teams.

  • 3 years ago

    Con - PR is corrupt, mismanaged and in endless need of "welfare" from the rest of the states.

    Con - PR doesn't want to be a state

    Con - No other states want PR to be a state

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