Let me make sure I understand the relationship between the coulomb and the farad...okay?

So... a coulomb is a quantity of electrons or electron holes, that would be the number of electrons that would course through a wire in one second of one amp of that wire. It's also the number of electrons and their holes that would be on the plates of a one farad capacitor at one volt. Now let me get this... show more So... a coulomb is a quantity of electrons or electron holes, that would be the number of electrons that would course through a wire in one second of one amp of that wire. It's also the number of electrons and their holes that would be on the plates of a one farad capacitor at one volt. Now let me get this straight; if one took an ideal, shorted, one farad capacitor that was truly electrically neutral, and charged it up with a one volt power source, (battery?) it would then have 6.242x10^18 electrons standing up on the surface of the negative plate, and it would ALSO have 6.242x10^18 electron holes wandering around in the matrix of the positive plate right? One coulomb of negative charge on one plate and one coulomb of positive charge on the other-- the holes that were left over when you moved the electrons from one side to the other!
Let me further assume that if you charged that same capacitor to a potential of two (2) volts, that you'd have 1.2484x10^19 electrons (two coulombs) stored on the negative plate etc. Under triple the pressure, you'd hold triple the quantity right?
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