Is $28k a year a good starting salary for an engineer?

I'm going to graduate with a Bachelor's degree in electrical engineering in April. I have just been hired for a job at a company. Would they be OK with it if, during salary negotiation, I said $28k per year with no benefits. I realize I would probably get an offer of at least double that, but $28k is all I feel that I'm worth.

13 Answers

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  • 3 years ago

    Why would they hire you if you don't think you're good enough?

    Self-confidence is a tricky thing to master, but you have to at least appear like you've got it.

    Ask them what they feel the right compensation is for the job. If it's any kind of yearly statement, aka a salary statement, then you best be sure they come with benefits, it's an automatic thing that should go with it.

    Keep in mind, you paid thousands for your education, so even if it feels like they're giving you a lot, remember that they're now footing the bill for it.

  • Bort
    Lv 6
    3 years ago

    Not even close. That's barely equivalent to $12 an hour USD and when you factor in that that is net, not take home (gross), it's even less. And you must also consider being a salaried employee you're going to have to work long hours sometimes if not all the time so it's going to be even less worth that offer. That is actually a horrible offer for an engineer. Their salary offer should be at least double that but it's commonly triple for an engineer that has a degree. If it's just an entry level position that does not require a degree it's possible it's a fair offer.

    It's only going to be around 19k/yr take home.

    I'm not sure I would even bother replying to that low-ball of an offer. If I did reply at all I would politically say that unless they can make a better compensation offer I'm going to have to decline.

  • 3 years ago

    My son obtained his Bachelor's in Electrical Engineering in April 2017.

    He rejected offers of $50000-60000 as being too low.

    Currently he earns substantially more than that and he gets pretty nice benefits.

  • tro
    Lv 7
    3 years ago

    it's a start

    with just graduating you aren't worth anything until they can find out what you can do

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  • Anonymous
    3 years ago

    I make that much as a receptionist at a clinic and I don't even have a degree.

    You're undervaluing yourself and that signals to the company there is something wrong with you and you won't get ANY offer.

  • Judy
    Lv 7
    3 years ago

    sounds low if you had a decent GPA

  • Eva
    Lv 7
    3 years ago

    Never smart to underprice yourself. If the going rate is $56k and you say you want 28, they'll know something is wrong and not hire you.

  • 3 years ago

    If you wanted to make <$15/hr, you could have skipped 4 years of school and just gotten a job as a warehouse worker or on the shipping dock. You'd be over $100,000 ahead now!

    When you first graduate from college you don't know what you're worth. There are surveys of starting salaries, especially for professionals like engineers. $28k/yr is what electrical engineers made in the 1970s! Hell, there's a large movement in the US to raise the MINIMUM WAGE to $15/hr, so $28k would be less than you'd make at McDonald's!

    Another thing. I'm retired now but all through my career I learned that the more money I made, the more respect I got. Making more money, even your boss respects you more. You get more perks, your job is even safer because the company values you by your salary.

  • 3 years ago

    I'm studying to be an engineer myself. Personally I wouldn't take less than 50k a year with benefits. I think you are worth a lot more than 28k for the set of skills you have. Don't undervalue what you went through to get the degree.

  • 3 years ago

    No, that’s actually a horrible starting salary for an engineer. Anyone who thought so little of them self to ask for a starting salary that far below market value would really make someone second-guess their decision to offer them a job.

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