Photographers Only! What do you think?

Whats the best shutter speed, aperture and ISO for a sunny day in a big city with lots of sights?

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Also, whats the best shutter speed, aperture and ISO for a CLOUDY, overcast day in a big city with lots of sights?

I am heading to Seattle in a few weeks, Im an inexperienced photographer

8 Answers

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  • John P
    Lv 7
    3 years ago
    Favorite Answer

    If the subject is illuminated directly by the sun (not in "skyscraper canyon") use ISO 100, 1/250th, f8. That might overexpose the lighter parts a bit. That level applies only in a city without much atmospheric pollution - no good in Shanghai!

    At the bottom of skyscraper canyon it is anybody's guess, even on a bright day.

    But all modern cameras give good guidance about exposure levels, so I suspect that the question is a homework question.

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  • Bernd
    Lv 7
    3 years ago

    Start with AUTO until you understand the basics of exposure.

    Explore youtube for good photo training videos...

    http://youtu.be/F8T94sdiNjc

    Youtube thumbnail

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  • hooray
    Lv 5
    3 years ago

    You can't just apply a few crude settings to broadly defined situations. However, the key point from your question is "in a few weeks". Use this time to work through tutorials online that explain photography basics. This will not transform you into a skilled photographer but it IS enough time to begin understanding what the major camera functions do, and to become familiar with the controls on your camera. As you read or watch a guide, refer to the camera's manual for how these functions operate on your specific camera and set up methodical experiments to see the effects for yourself.

  • keerok
    Lv 7
    3 years ago

    I think the best setting is Auto mode.

    Seriously!

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  • 3 years ago

    Just some advice: if your camera has exposure bracketing, read the manual/instructions, that will increase the chance of you getting the optimal photo, and make sure you change the imaging format to RAW+Jpeg if you have that feature so that when you get access to a RAW program like Photoshop, you have more flexibility. You can also use HDR. I'd use a relatively large aperture, and try with various ISO settings.

  • 3 years ago

    Here is my advice to you. Put the camera in the "P" mode (Program) and let it make these decisions for you. You have no where near the experience or knowledge to be trying to set all these factors yourself.

    • Benjamin3 years agoReport

      Will try that, thank you

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  • 3 years ago

    There isn't one setting for all situations. The rule for this is called the sunny f-16 rule where you set the aperture to f/16 and the speed will be the inverse of the ISO, ISO 200 with 1/200th second or vice versa. Why not just use auto exposure then tailor for effects you want.

  • 3 years ago

    Read the manual that came with your camera. It will explain how to use the light meter. The ISO should be as low as you can get it without having to use a tripod (which I assume you don't have anyway.....)

    Try ISO 100. The shutter speed should be equal to or faster than the focal length of the lens (XXXmm on the lens itself - if you are using a zoom lens, look for the larger number example 24-105 mm, then use ISO 100.) Considering Seattle is overcast most of the time, you might have to go to 200 or 400 to keep your shutter speed fast enough for handholding. Try not to go over 400, as you will probably get a lot of noise at 800 and higher. If you set your ISO right and set the shutter based on the focal length, the meter will give you the correct aperture. Use the Tv setting on your camera to keep the shutter speed constant and manually set the ISO to 100 or 200 (or 400 if need be.)

    Read the manual and practice a bit before you go.

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