Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Politics & GovernmentLaw & Ethics · 2 years ago

Are credit card charges made with a joint credit card prior to death bills of the estate ?

I had POA while my father was alive. We also shared a joint credit card so I could shop for him and pay bills.

I paid household utility bills, medical supplies and prescriptions with the credit card while he was alive. He passed away before the bill came. I know I'm legally responsible for the charges being it was a joint card. Are these expenses mine now or are they bills of the estate?

Update:

@Pascal The actual bills were not in my name. My name isn't on his telephone or electric bill or charge acct at the drug store, etc. etc.

Update 2:

@STEVEN I paid my credit card bill in full. I don't believe in paying interest.

Update 3:

Correction, not bills of the estate. Bills I can submit to the estate, which I would like to be reimbursed for.

Update 4:

@STEVEN P I said "I knew I was legally responsible". That is not the question or the issue.

3 Answers

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  • martin
    Lv 7
    2 years ago
    Favorite Answer

    They are bills of the estate because you exercised power of attorney to buy merchandise, supplies, that your father needed. You weren't shopping for yourself.

    • STEVEN F
      Lv 7
      2 years agoReport

      Power of Attorney is 100% IRRELEVANT to the joint account. Even if the charges were entirely for personal use of the surviving account holder, the liability of BOTH the estate AND the survivor would be the same.

  • 2 years ago

    They are not expenses of the estate because the bill is in your name now. Had they not been paid at all and he passed, then they would be estate bills.

  • 2 years ago

    Yes AND no. BOTH the estate AND the surviving party are 100% liable for 100% of the account balance at the time of death.

    That said, as long a the surviving account holder continues to pay the bill, it is extremely uncommon for the card issuer to attempt to collect from the estate. Failing to make such an attempt DOES NOT release the survivor from legal liablity for the ENTIRE balance.

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