Greg asked in Arts & HumanitiesHistory · 3 years ago

What did the Picts use to paint themselves?

The picts are immortalized historically for painting themselves blue before battle. However I happen to know that blue is one of the rarest naturally occurring pigments, so that begs the question of how exactly did the ancient picts make the paint that they used upon themselves.

Update:

The picts are immortalized historically for painting themselves blue before battle. However I happen to know that blue is one of the rarest naturally occurring pigments, so that begs the question of how exactly did the ancient picts make the paint that they used upon themselves. Do we have any archaeological evidence of their paint perhaps fossilized or maybe preserved on a bog body, any Roman accounts of their paint, etc.?

14 Answers

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  • ?
    Lv 6
    3 years ago

    Woad.

  • Anonymous
    3 years ago

    They did not paint themselves at all, that is a myth.

  • Tina
    Lv 7
    3 years ago

    "The Latin word Picti first occurs in a panegyric written by Eumenius in AD 297 and is taken to mean "painted or tattooed people" (from Latin pingere "to paint";[3] pictus, "painted"

    No one is quite clear in what way the Picti were 'painted' - they may, as Julius Caesar said the Britons did have used war-paint, or more permanent tattoos or scarification.

    A number of othe posters have pointed out that blue dye was readily accessible.

  • Anonymous
    3 years ago

    You "know something" that isn't true then: because woad grows all over Europe and its use ensured that for millennia light-to-mid-blue was one of the cheapest colours for textile dyeing.

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  • Anonymous
    3 years ago

    Rollers.

  • Lili
    Lv 7
    3 years ago

    If you read anything about the Picts or Britons, you should have run across the term "woad" or "blue woad". See below, and learn how to use the expression "begs the question" correctly.

  • Tim D
    Lv 7
    3 years ago

    Caesar wrote of the Britons (not the Picts, he never got near them) as painting on woad before battle. As a byproduct it turns out woad has antiseptic qualities.

  • 3 years ago

    ok

  • Anonymous
    3 years ago

    Woad - made from the isatis tinctoria plant. Which was (and still is) extremely common in Britain.

  • Anonymous
    3 years ago

    No, it doesn't "beg" that question; it "raises" or "suggests' it. "To beg the question" means something very different.

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