Wouldn't it be illegal Goodwill to sell property once they are informed that the product is stolen?

Update:

I have a friend. Her husband flipped out, bagged up all of her and her kids possessions and took them to Goodwill while she was vacationing. When she contacted goodwill, they had her product but claimed that they now own it and that show could buy the Jewelry and other items at auction. Wouldn't it be illegal for them to proceed in processing and disbursing property once they have been put on notice that it is stolen? I'm thinking that they should have contacted the police.

Update 2:

Before selecting a "BA" I wanted to update you all. The court said that while he did not commit a crime, GW should have exercised a little "Good Will" and at least held the property. The husband was held 100 responsible for everything that was removed from the home and she is divorcing him. Thank you all.

8 Answers

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  • ZCT
    Lv 7
    3 years ago
    Favorite Answer

    Once Goodwill have been informed that the items they hold are stolen, they have no legal right to sell it. They would literally be participating in the crime of selling stolen property.

    File a police report, provide as much proof as possible as to what happened, and take steps to recover the items. If Goodwill won't co-operate, have a lawyer sue them for damages, and file a criminal complaint against them. Contact the corporate office too, let them know what is going on.

    Oh and divorce the loser and take him for every penny of child support you can get out of him. Being in a relationship like this is completely insane. No excuse for this kind of behavior.

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  • 3 years ago

    Those aren't stolen items.

    Which is why the police were not involved and why when Goodwill demanded a police report backing her claim, she could not provide one.

    As her husband, these items belonged as much to him as they did to her.

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  • 3 years ago

    Generally, yes. Anybody who is informed that they have stolen property has to make reasonable efforts to return the property to the owner. If they received the property in good faith, they're allowed to charge the costs of returning the property.

    Charging anything more than 5% of the property value is likely to be regarded as not reasonable. But under some special circumstances, they could charge up to the full value.

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  • 3 years ago

    There is a technicality here.

    If they are not legally separated or divorced, everything they each own is more than likely marital property. Until there is a legal separation or divorce, everything *can* be disposed of by him. She would also need to provide proof that she or they ever owned any of it.

    Goodwill doesn't like to be caught in situations like this, but the fact is, if she is still married to him, he didn't steal it. he disposed of things he had legal access to trash. It doesn't make it nice or even reasonable, but it's not technically stolen goods.

    That having been said, he must provide for his children, so he had better get shopping.

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  • 3 years ago

    Who informed them?

    • She went to goodwill and told them that the items on their dock belonged to her.

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  • Maxi
    Lv 7
    3 years ago

    Yes

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  • 3 years ago

    If it's already sold prior to being informed? Prior to local store employees being made aware? Not at all. An unfortunate circumstance. Whether it just walked away out the door? Or, shipped off from an online auction sale. They have no culpability for ignorance nor system delay. At best they'll hand you the sale proceeds. You could possibly trace the buyer? Buyers must register online. Many counter sales are credit-debit. But, credit-debit wise they can't tell you the individual item on receipt.

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  • Lv 7
    3 years ago

    if the police tell them, then yes, they must return it.

    but just any random person on the street could totally make that up, which is why you need to make a police report, and provide proof of ownership.

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