I need three reasons on how does the setting affect characterization in To Kill a Mockingbird?

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  • 3 years ago
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    1. The book takes place in rural Alabama during the 1930's. During this time, most of the southeastern United States had major issues with racism. This affects how Tom Robinson is treated by other civilians and the justice system

    2. The town is very rural and in the middle of the Great Depression, meaning that most of the characters are incredibly poor. As a result, many of the characters have a 'small town' mentality where everyone knows everybody's business

    3. Because of the time period the novel takes place in, there is not only economic hardship and racial tension, but also poor education of many of the Maycomb people. Educational levels have a great effect on how people interact with each other and live their lives

    Of course, you'll have to find examples from the book (and make sure to read it). Hope this helps

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  • 3 years ago

    1. small town atmosphere invites the gossiping behavior (albeit this is stereotyped behavior)

    2. time period where Jim crow is in full swing and white people who are racist against black people are attacking white people who are not, making Atticus' behavior brave and allowing us to see public behavior

    3. the smallish household of Atticus, his 2 children, and one maid invite us in to see the private behavior of these characters

    Source(s): my words use all you like
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