Why does the sun keep on shining?

15 Answers

Relevance
  • 3 years ago

    To keep all planets plants growing so all species can survive. I'm thinking if on some planets in our Universe there are no human beings, just maybe they can be colonized. Mike

    Source(s): Universal Logic
    • Login to reply the answers
  • Scott
    Lv 7
    3 years ago

    because of the intense heat of the hydrogen and helium the Sun is made up of

    • Login to reply the answers
  • 3 years ago

    Because Donald Trump keeps thinking the Sun shines out of his A$$.

    • Login to reply the answers
  • 3 years ago

    well, several things.....

    1 Gravity You need gravity to keep it all together

    2 Hydrogen. Hydrogen is the source of most of the energy that we see as "shine"

    3 Electromagnetism In a sense that is what connects the heat to make the photons that are the "shine" we see.

    in brief Gravity compresses the hydrogen to convert to helium providing the heat that couples by electromagnetism to produce the shine. okay you got some other things going on with the weak and the strong force but this is most of it.

    • Login to reply the answers
  • How do you think about the answers? You can sign in to vote the answer.
  • 3 years ago

    Because nobody can turn it off.

    Source(s): Don't they know? It's the end of the World, it ended when you said good bye.
    • Login to reply the answers
  • 3 years ago

    Actually, that question was one of the great scientific mysteries of the previous century. The continued shining of our Sun over the eons was impossible to understand or explain in the 1800s and early 1900s. There was also no good and reasonable scientific explanation for the creation of our Moon, which led some scientists to conclude that the Moon does not exist, and by analogy, that the Sun does not shine. However, it is nearly impossible to conclude that the Sun does not shine.

    With the help of Albert Einstein's theories of Relativity (E=mc²) and the better understanding of atomic nuclear reactions, it became clear that the Sun shines as a black body with the ongoing heat source being the continual conversion of matter into energy via nuclear fusion of Hydrogen into Helium. So the Sun does shine after all. (And the Moon does also exist, but that is a different story.....)

    • Login to reply the answers
  • Ray
    Lv 7
    3 years ago

    Part of the reason for its longevity is its immense gravity. Scientists have estimated that the light (photons) leaving the sun, in some cases, is relatively old, as the gravity keeps them from exiting all at once. A good example are sun spots. These are areas of very dense matter that surface for a period and have extremely strong gravitational fields that can change the course of photons of light.

    • Login to reply the answers
  • 3 years ago

    Sheer stubbornness.

    Cheers!

    • Login to reply the answers
  • Bill-M
    Lv 7
    3 years ago

    Nuclear Fusion of Hydrogen Gas. AND there is enough Hydrogen to keep it running for another 4.5 Billion Years.

    • Login to reply the answers
  • 3 years ago

    The sun is a huge fusion reactor, converting hydrogen into helium. And, it's got a *lot* of hydrogen, so - in total, it'll burn about 10 billion years; today, we're about 1/2 way through it's life span.

    • Login to reply the answers
Still have questions? Get your answers by asking now.