Harold
Lv 4
Harold asked in Cars & TransportationAircraft · 4 years ago

Can someone please list all flight ratings from private pilot to airline transport pilot?

Please list it in order, and what I mean is like PPL, IFR and VFR ratings, just every rating needed for this entire process.

5 Answers

Relevance
  • Peter
    Lv 4
    4 years ago
    Favorite Answer

    Hier it is, in a nutshell (w/out going thru too many extraneous details):

    Student Pilot---requires passing of a written exam.

    Private Pilot (ASEL-Aircraft Single Engine-Land)--requires passing a written exam and Flight Check Ride

    Private Pilot License or PPL (ASEL Instrument)--requires passing a written exam and Flight Check Ride

    Commercial Pilot (CPL ASEL Instrument) --requires passing a written exam and Flight Check Ride

    Flight Instructor ASE (there are several levels on this rating. They are in order: CFI, CFII, and MEI)--requires passing a written exam and Flight Check Ride

    Flight Instructor ASE, Instrument (as sited above)

    Commercial Pilot ASEL AMEL, Instrument--requires passing a written exam and Flight Check Ride

    Flight Instructor ASE, AME, Instrument (as cited above)

    Airline Transport Pilot (ATP)--the highest rating, requires passing a written exam and Flight Check Ride

    For most pro flying jobs, MEI (multi-engine instrument) is a must. It's also the most expensive to get in my experience, but if you have multi-engine experience in the military services...is a breeze to acquire.

    @dumbasspilot---You were slightly intelligent until you added details. Which just goes to prove that less is always more.

    Understand US requirements are a bit different from Australia, where I started...which I will digress on, since your ground is obviously in US soil, so let's live for the moment for US rules:

    Student Pilot--back in my days at 'Oz' we must pass a written exam. Here in the USA, this requires at least a 3rd class med. certif. plus Student pilot certif w/c are issued by an FAA inspector or an FAA-designated pilot examiner. Applicants who who have physical disabilities or fail some requirements should contact the nearest FAA office. They must be at least 16 years old. This certificate has 24 months validity. and requires endorsement by CFI to fly solo.

    Private Pilot (ASEL-Aircraft Single Engine-Land)--requires passing a written exam and Flight Check Ride...terminology differences by stating written or admin by computer...you stated practical exam. The word exam implies the candidate needs to pass it.

    Private Pilot License or PPL (ASEL Instrument)--you stated "IN THE US, .NO SUCH THING. AN INSTRUMENT RATING IS ADDED TO YOU PRIVATE PILOT(OR COMMERCIAL) CERTIFICATE" -----ha ha. Testing consists of a written exam and a practical test (known more commonly as the check ride). The check ride is divided into an oral component to verify that the applicant understands the theory of instrument flying and an actual flight to ensure the pilot possesses the practical skills required for safe IFR flight.

    This applies to CPL also, since all flights operating in Class A airspace, defined as the airspace from 18,000 MSL up to FL 600 (roughly 60,000 feet), must be conducted under IFR. In the United States, an instrument rating is required when operating under Special visual flight rules (SVFR) at night. The Canadian license VFR OTT (over the top) allows private as well as commercial pilots to cross IMC areas when start and end of the trip is performed under VFR conditions.

    Same applies for CPL....In the UK, private pilots can attend a less intensive training to acquire the IMC rating, restricted to the national airspace. This does not confer the privileges of a full Instrument Rating, but allows flight in IMC outside controlled airspace, IFR flight in class D and E airspace

    Flight Instructor ASE (there are several levels on this rating. They are in order: CFI, CFII, and MEI)--requires passing a written exam and Flight Check Ride

    "WHAT IN THE HELL IS FLIGHT INSTRUCTOR ASE?, AFTER OVER 30 YEARS OF GENERAL AVIATION EXPERIENCE , THIS IS THE FIRST TIME I HAVE HEARD OF IT."

    Well, in hell, this means ASE is just that Aircraft Single Engine in some countries, CFIs are pre classified for single or multi engine...so ASE means just that, in reference to single engine aircraft. One can't be an instructor for Multi-engine if your experience as an instructor is for SE. For example in New Zealand, Flight instructors must have a Category A, B, C, D or E flight instructor rating for SE or multi eng. In Canada, the holder of a commercial pilot licence or airline transport pilot licence may have their licence endorsed with a flight instructor rating - aeroplane. Initially, the pilot is endorsed as a Class 4 flight instructor. This allows the pilot to deliver flight training towards the issuance of a Recreational Pilot Permit, Private Pilot Licence, Commercial Pilot Licence, Night Rating, and VFR Over-the-top Rating. The Class 4 flight instructor can also only conduct training while under the supervision of a Class 2 or Class 1 flight instructor. And I could go aon and on...for diff. countries.

    Commercial Pilot ASEL AMEL, Instrument--requires passing a written exam and Flight Check Ride

    AGAIN, YOU DO NOT HAVE TO BE INSTRUMENT RATED FOR THE COMM CERTIFICATE.

    NO SUCH THING AS .."Commercial Pilot ASEL AMEL, Instrument"

    -----Different types of Commercial Pilot Certificates/Licenses are issued for the major categories of aircraft: Airplanes, helicopters, gyro-planes, balloons, and airships. For airplanes, there are type ratings, which I know they lump together here for CPLs.

    A Certificate/License will contain a number of sub-qualifications or ratings. These specify in more detail the actual privileges of the license, including the types of aircraft that can be flown, whether flight under Instrument Flight Rules is allowed, and whether instructing and examining of trainee pilots can be done.

    Airline Transport Pilot (ATP)--the highest rating, requires passing a written exam and Flight Check Ride "ALSO REQUIRES ONE HAVE SUBSTANTIAL EXPERIENCE"

    -----Understand what you meant by "SUBSTANTIAL EXPERIENCE" requires a minimum pilot experience of 1500 hours of flight time and 500 hours of cross-country flight time, 100 hours night time, 75 hours instrument (simulated or actual). Other requirements include being 23 years of age, instrument rating, a rigorous written examination, (notice the terminology once more I used..."written"..)...and being of good moral character.

    For most pro flying jobs, MEI (multi-engine instrument) is a must. It's also the most expensive to get in my experience, but if you have multi-engine experience in the military services...is a breeze to acquire.

    "A MULTI ENGINE CERTIFICATE IS NOT THE MOST EXPENSIVE TO GET ON ITS OWN...."

    -----So what?...it may not be to you, but for me it was the most expensive to get after getting out of the RAAF. Trying to get back to civilian flying is different 15 years ago.

    BTW, your desperation for attention is pitiful, what with all those CAPITAL LETTERS. May I suggest something? Please take your hair-splitting somewhere else....

  • 4 years ago

    The process isn't exactly the same for all pilots, but a very typical sequence would go like this:

    You get a Third Class medical Certificate, which is also your Student Pilot Certificate.

    Then you get your PPL (Private Pilot's License).

    Then you get your Instrument Rating.

    Then you get your Commercial Pilot Certificate (the PPL goes away... you do not have BOTH a CPL and PPL).

    Most pilots at this point then get a Flight Instructor's Certificate (CFI or CFII).

    Then you get a Multi-Engine rating (AMEL). If you want to teach pilots to fly a twin, you get MEI.

    Years later, with 1500 hours total time, you get your ATP (now your CPL and Instrument rating go away, your license simply says "ATP" because it automatically qualifies you for commercial and instrument privileges among additional things).

    Then an airline sends you to get a TYPE rating to fly their aircraft, or, if you decide to be a corporate pilot, you pay for a type rating yourself.

    Something like that.

  • 4 years ago

    See 14 CFR 61 -

    The licenses (FAA certificates) are Private Pilot, Commercial Pilot and Airline Transport Pilot -

    There is no "order" for ratings -

    Which "process" do you ask about...?

    Source(s): Retired airline pilot
  • Anonymous
    4 years ago

    So what's the deal here, Snowflake... Are you saying you are too lazy or too stupid to use the Internet to do your own searches for information?

    Either way, you're NOT going to get very far in building a career in aviation.

  • How do you think about the answers? You can sign in to vote the answer.
Still have questions? Get your answers by asking now.