Ali asked in PetsDogs · 4 years ago

Issue with dog virus?

I had a dog that had a virus. We gave her away for adoption and are planning to get a new dog and it will stay in the same place as the old dog, Can the virus affect the new dog. If yes how can I prevent this?

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  • 4 years ago
    Favorite Answer

    Yes, by providing the proper vaccinations first and disinfecting your premises thoroughly, depending on what the virus was.

    Parvo

    Prevention is the only way to ensure that a puppy or dog remain healthy because the disease is extremely virulent and contagious. Appropriate vaccination should be performed starting at 7–8 weeks of age, with a booster given every 3–4 weeks until at least 16 weeks of age.

    The virus is extremely hardy and has been found to survive in feces and other organic material such as soil for over 10 years. It survives extremely low and high temperatures. The only household disinfectant that kills the virus is bleach. The dilute bleach solution needs to be a (1:10 ratio) to disinfect and kill parvovirus.

    Puppies are generally vaccinated in a series of doses, extending from the earliest time that the immunity derived from the mother wears off until after that passive immunity is definitely gone. Older puppies (16 weeks or older) are given 3 vaccinations 3 to 4 weeks apart.

    The duration of immunity of vaccines has been found to be at least three years after the initial puppy series and a booster 1 year later. Neighbours and family members with dogs should be notified of infected animals so that they can ensure that their dogs are vaccinated or tested for immunity. The vaccine will take up to 2 weeks to reach effective levels of immunity.

    Distemper

    The disease is highly contagious via inhalation and fatal 50% of the time. Despite extensive vaccination in many regions, it remains a major disease of dogs, and is the leading cause of infectious disease death in dogs.

    Puppies from three to six months old are particularly susceptible. CDV spreads through aerosol droplets and through contact with infected bodily fluids, including nasal and ocular secretions, feces, and urine, six to 22 days after exposure. It can also be spread by food and water contaminated with these fluids. The time between infection and disease is 14 to 18 days, although a fever can appear from three to six days after infection.

    A dog that survives distemper will continue to have both nonlife-threatening and life-threatening signs throughout its lifespan. The most prevalent nonlife-threatening symptom is hard pad disease. This occurs when a dog experiences the thickening of the skin on the pads of its paws as well as on the end of its nose. Another lasting symptom commonly is enamel hypoplasia. Puppies, especially, will have damage to the enamel of teeth that are not completely formed or those that have not yet grown through the gums. This is a result of the virus's killing the cells responsible for manufacturing the tooth enamel. These affected teeth tend to erode quickly.

    Life-threatening signs usually include those due to the degeneration of the nervous system. Dogs that have been infected with distemper tend to suffer a progressive deterioration of mental abilities and motor skills. With time, the dog can acquire more severe seizures, paralysis, reduction in sight and incoordination. These dogs are usually humanely euthanized because of the immense pain and suffering they face.

    A number of vaccines against canine distemper exist for dogs, which in many jurisdictions are mandatory for pets. Infected animals should be quarantined from other dogs for several months owing to the length of time the animal may shed the virus. The virus is destroyed in the environment by routine cleaning with disinfectants, detergents, or drying. It does not survive in the environment for more than a few hours at room temperature (20–25 °C), but can survive for a few weeks in shady environments at temperatures slightly above freezing.

    There is no specific treatment for the canine distemper. The supportive care is geared towards treating fluid/electrolyte imbalances, neurological symptoms, and preventing any secondary bacterial infections.

    Outbreaks of canine distemper continue to occur throughout the United States and elsewhere, and are caused by many factors. These factors include the overpopulation of dogs and the irresponsibility of pet owners.

    An unaccountable number of strays that lack vaccinations are therefore more susceptible to diseases such as canine distemper. These strays act as a host for the virus, spreading it throughout the surrounding area, including urban areas. Puppies and dogs that have not received their shots can then be infected if in a place where many dogs interact, such as a dog park.

    The irresponsibility of pet owners is another factor that contributes to ongoing outbreaks of canine distemper. Puppies should begin vaccination at six to eight weeks of age and then continue getting the “booster shot” every two to four weeks until they are 16 weeks of age. Without the full series of shots, the vaccination will not provide protection against the virus. Since puppies are typically sold at the age of eight to ten weeks, they typically receive the first shot while still with their breeder, but the new owner often does not finish the series. These dogs are not protected against the virus and so are susceptible to canine distemper infection, continuing the downward spiral that leads to outbreaks throughout the country.

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    • GllntKnight
      Lv 7
      4 years agoReport

      No vaccine will provide 100% protection.Yes,everything should be disinfected with bleach.Whenever you get a new dog,it's your responsibility to take it and a fresh fecal specimen to a vet within 48 hours of getting it.Any further concerns should be directed to your vet.Good luck/have a good holiday.

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  • J C
    Lv 7
    4 years ago

    You gave a dog way because it had a virus? What will you do with the new one if/when it, too gets sick? Depending on the virus a new dog can catch it too. Did you discuss sanitizing your home with the vet, and the risks of bringing a new dog in with this virus? Do you even know what the virus was? This is really something to discuss with the vet. We have no clue what virus your former dog had, and the kind of virus is very important.

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  • 4 years ago

    What 'virus'? Parvovirus remains in the soil for ages and as you can't bleach the entire garden, you'd be best not to bring any unvaccinated dog onto your property for a long time. Talk to your vet about what steps you should take to make sure any new dog you have, is safe.

    How in the world did you 'give away' a dog who had 'a virus'? To say nothing of why!! Kennel Cough is usually the viral kind, although it can be bacterial. And there are, just as with humans, any number of virus doing the rounds.

    https://www.vetinfo.com/common-viral-infections-do...

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  • Anonymous
    4 years ago

    if it was parvo virus very certainly also dogs are not throw away items if they get sick So in all honesty if i were you i wouldnt consider getting another unless i adopted a far better attitude toward dogs before i did..... Dogs are for life you see and are not disposable items to be discarded or given up for adoption when sick

    Source(s): shepherd
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  • 4 years ago

    Reported for SPAM. Shame on you for dumping the sick dog and getting a new one which will end up DEAD because the disease will still be out in yard and in your home. WTF???

    Did you even bother to tell the people you dumped your sick dog on that it had Parvo???

    How can I prevent parvovirus to transfer to another dog?

    Our old dog had parvovirus and left my house yesterday and the new dog is coming in a few days and will be kept in the same place as the old one. The new dog already had vaccines. But are vaccines enough for the dog not to be affected? And our old dog walked around the whole house

    Dogs · 59 mins ago

    How can I prevent parvovirus to transfer to another dog?

    Our old dog had parvovirus and left my house yesterday and the new dog is coming in a few days and will be kept in the same place as the old one. The new dog already had vaccines. But are vaccines enough for the dog not to be affected? And our old dog walked around the whole house

    2 answers · Dogs · 59 mins ago

    How can I prevent parvovirus to transfer to another dog?

    Our old dog had parvovirus and left my house yesterday and the new dog is coming in a few days and will be kept in the same place as the old one. The new dog already had vaccines. But are vaccines enough for the dog not to be affected? And our old dog walked around the whole house

    3 answers · Dogs · 5 hours ago

    How can I prevent parvovirus to transfer to another dog?

    Our old dog had parvovirus and the new dog will be kept in the same place as the old one. The new dog already had vaccines. But are vaccines enough for the dog not to be affected? And our old dog walked around the whole hous

    1 answer · Dogs · 16 hours ago

    Issue with dog virus?

    I had a dog that had a virus. We gave her away for adoption and are planning to get a new dog and it will stay in the same place as the old dog, Can the virus affect the new dog. If yes how can I prevent this?

    4 answers · Dogs · 23 hours ago

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
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