Anonymous

Why do so many white people think they're native americans?

Everywhere I go, someone has to say, oh I'm a Native american too. First off, when the white people came and started infecting the eastcost it pushed the natives out other there land and the white people moved in. Do you think a Native would even want to go near the white people, or even so, have kids with them. They were sent into bad lands and kept there until they would be killed off. Then there was the move up to Canida. Yea, there are some tribes that are left. And its not everyday you see a native walking around on the street. And the reservations in america have poor homes and bad education so they cant even get a job outside the reservation. Its just a slow extermination. So then why does everyone insist they have the blood in them? Even though you were born in America, it doesn't mean you have Native blood in ya.

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  • 3 years ago
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    Our native people have what can be considered a dual citizenship but what it means is not the same as someone born in one country to parents of two different countries.

    At one time, our native people were not considered citizens of this country - never mind that they were here first. They were not accorded the same rights as the immigrated euros that took over the country. Also, you must take in consideration that different states have and always have had, different laws.

    The Indian Citizenship Act was accorded federally to unify and equalize the citizenship of all native people across the country to eliminate different laws in different states as much as it was done to give the people legal status in this country. It also provided the politicians with more constituents and later, votes - non-citizens can't be represented,let alone vote. That alone was a predominant factor over the others.

    Each nation (some people say tribe but there are tribes within the nations) has some sovereign laws that have been accorded to them (mostly by treaties) and they must maintain rolls with each member's name and assigned number. There are some exceptions to this such as patriarchal lineage lists etc. Being listed on the rolls and properly registered with the nation gives that person a "citizenship" with that nation.

    The foremost legal citizenship is the same as anyone else born in the United States. Most indian people will claim their nation citizenry first though. I know I do.

    In summation, we have "dual citizenships" but not in the legal aspect of the term. We are considered by the government (when they bother to consider us at all) as U.S. citizens first and by racial terms second followed by a tribal affiliation last.

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  • 3 years ago

    Whenever I leave the res and go back to New York, at least a dozen people a day want to tell me all about their cherokee great -grandmother. They see me and say "Hey, you're indian! Cool! I'm indian too!" and they are almost disappointed when I don't embrace them as a long lost brother or sister. I've got a new response- when someone tells me they're indian, I just switch into speaking Navajo. (doesn't matter that they said they were cherokee and I don't speak any cherokee-they don't even know the difference) I'll go on for several minutes, animatedly smiling and talking to them in Navajo. They just smile and nod their head, while I'm telling them what a jerk they are. (in Navajo)

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  • 3 years ago

    They may think people would regard them as more interesting/exotic/spiritual if they claim they have certain ancestries like native american. When you say you're part native, people may look curious at you, inspecting carefully your face to find any native traits and paying more attention to what you say.

    I suppose the fact that people are relatively ignorant about native americans and don't have often the chance to interact with them may explain why they don't see them as common, normal people like you and me. They only see the stereotypes portrayed in films.

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  • 3 years ago

    I'm a native American. I was born in America, thus I am native to this country, which makes me a NATIVE AMERICAN. If I was born in France, I'd be native to FRANCE....and then I'd be a NATIVE FRENCHMAN. I wonder how much of your genes are white.

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  • Anonymous
    3 years ago

    I don't. I hate native Americans.

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  • 3 years ago

    Because they are. Native concerns birth - a person is a native of the country/place in which they were born.

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  • 3 years ago

    Most people are a mix. My great grandmother was Cree, so I can trace my lineage and many others can say the same.

    Of course, there are some who claim ancestry they don't have.

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  • Anonymous
    3 years ago

    The same thing is going on in Australia.

    Bro. Your ancestors were a bunch of Britains trash

    The true owners of this land are the Aboriginals! Must give the land back!

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  • 3 years ago
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