Is it racist against White people, if I adapt a classical European story to a non-White setting or with non-Whites as the characters?

For example, a Bollywood (Indian) movie based on "Romeo and Juliet".

Or, creating a story based on "Sleeping Beauty", but it is set in feudal Japan.

Or writing about "The Merchant of Venice", but with Maori characters in modern-day New Zealand.

I thought that doing so would be racist against White people, because replacing the setting and characters of the stories' original background would be "erasing White history" (like the new Marvel non-White superheroes, or Star Wars Episode VII), so it would be considered "White Genocide".

So, is it racist against White people to adapt stories from White cultures into non-White settings, and having non-White characters?

4 Answers

Relevance
  • Deino
    Lv 7
    3 years ago
    Favorite Answer

    It is not uncommon for authors to take a classic story and alter the setting and the characters for the sake of intrigue, comedy, modern cultural relevance, etc.

    A great modern example would be that fantastic Romeo and Juliet with Leonardo DiCaprio, where they spoke of duels and the like in Shakesperian language but were actually shooting guns at each other in the street, like modern gangsters.

    You could just as easily take a story like Hansel and Gretel, make them black, and get them lost somewhere they don't belong, replacing the witch and even her motives with any one of hundreds of different types of characters who could fill the role of an evil opportunist who would harm children.

    And so on.

    • Login to reply the answers
  • Anonymous
    3 years ago

    Yes

    • Login to reply the answers
  • Anonymous
    3 years ago

    Yes

  • Anonymous
    3 years ago

    White people have their own stories and pride

    Nonwhite people have their own stories and pride as well....Thats it simple as that...No need to reinvent history and literature friend !

    • HorsesPlease19
      Lv 6
      3 years agoReport

      And yet people reinvent other cultures' stories without a shred of hatred or shame, but sometimes out of appreciation, whether from non-White to White or from White to non-White. If not, I might as well make up some of my own, because I love to write stories and dream.

    • Login to reply the answers
Still have questions? Get your answers by asking now.