Is modern Formula One too safe?

The biggest appeal of motor racing is the danger, yet in Formula One there has only been one fatality in the last 20 years.

Racing drivers are disposable, even if an average of 2 drivers died every year there would still be plenty of drivers willing to race in F1. It could become a sport that once again rewards bravery, rather than be a sport for general athletes that bear much more resemblance to the faint hearted footballers of the EPL.

There overall decline in Formula One viewership and interest demonstrates this, F1 still has most of its fans, but it is not commonly watched by casual fans of sport or the general population (worldwide, not just in the UK).

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  • 3 years ago
    Favorite Answer

    The biggest appeal to motorsports is not the danger. that is an incredibly twisted way of looking at things.

    motorsports like any other competition is about people working hard to compete against each other.

    F1 engineers work tirelessly to make a car as fast as possible within the rules set and F1 drivers work to drive their cars faster than others to win races.

    Thinking that people are disposable is incredibly twisted and can hint at signs of mental problems. I think you should go see a therapist or psychiatrist to see if you may have some mental disorders that could cause you to be dangerous to yourself or others.

    The decline of F1 viewership is indeed real but I dont think that it is because of too high safety standards.

    when Jules Bianchi passed away in 2015 we did not get a massive spike in viewership suggesting that people want to see crashes and thats it. same thing happened with the horrific crash that severely injured Felippe Massa back in 2009.

    Currently F1 does reward bravery. if you look at some of the stuff that Max Verstappen has done in his last couple races you will see that his bravery has gotten him positions and even a win.

    F1 drivers need to work with what they have and currently the formula is set so skillful tire management and maintaining a fast yet clean pace yields the best rewards but I dont think this is improved by making cars less safe. i think what is coming up for next year is a proper way to go. make cars that reward lots of driver skill and are not so easy to recover. cars that are faster and more on edge. but I certainly don't think that the way to reward bravery is to make the cars less safe.

    • Kyu-and-Ei
      Lv 4
      3 years agoReport

      Couldn't agree more than this! Awesome answer!

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  • 3 years ago

    I get where you're coming from, personally I don't mind the safety increase but I think some of the new ideas are simply ridiculous, for example: the halo system i highly doubt would have saved Jules from his crash. The race should have been stopped while the previously crashed car was being removed. F1 is open cockpit racing and the concept of half closing the cockpit defeats the purpose.

    Secondly, safety is barely an issue with the strength of the cars today. Look at some of the insane crashes that occur and drivers walk away with the worst injury being they bumped their knees together. I think F1 is as safe as it can get, anything that requires such a major change in the safety of the cars should just be red flagged instead. Don't ruin the sport for a bit of safety, if they're unsure they should stop the race, clear the danger and then continue. So far the only death in the last 20 years was Jules (if memory serves correctly) and that was due to the race not being stopped. It had nothing to do with the build of the car as his head hit the crane first instead of any part of the car.

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  • Anonymous
    3 years ago

    It's absurd to suggest that deaths in the sport are what makes it appeal to people. If you really, genuinely believe that, and you want to see racing drivers die on a regular basis, you bigger problems, but I suspect you're just a troll.

    The stats completely fail to bare our your suggestion that F1 needs deaths to make it more appealing. The massive growth period for the sport, when it went from being an obscure and rarely televised minority attraction, into a gigantic global brand, took place between the deaths of Riccardo Paletti in 1982 and the San Marino race in 1994. True Elio de Angelis died in 1986, but that didn't happen at a race. Drivers weren't dying on a regular basis, as they had in the 1960s and 70s, and it did nothing to dim the appeal of the sport. Basically, you're talking nonsense.

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  • 3 years ago

    Every motorsport emphasis safety now. I would say that part of the appeal of stock car racing is the how the drivers walk away from horrific looking wrecks. That way, the fans don't feel any guilt for enjoying a good wreck. Everything from dragsters to hydroplanes kill off far fewer people than they used to. Just as passenger cars have become safer, race cars are safer. Remember that the FIA is about more than just racing.

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  • 3 years ago

    Disposable? That's extremely derrogatory. They're there to compete and entertain, that does not include intentionally putting their lives on the line. Those times are gone, and you make it sound like it isn't devastating when a driver dies in any motorsport. It certainly was when Jules Bianchi died. The appeal is good racing and overtakes

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  • 3 years ago

    You sound like one of the gawpers who feel the need to slow down, or even stop, when there's a road accident.

    It could be said that accidents make for more 'fun' (to some), but that's usually only if you don't value a human life?

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  • rosbif
    Lv 7
    3 years ago

    Safety or danger has never interested me greatly in terms of watching motorsport. The racing being boring, the drivers being automatons and the season being impossible to watch on free-to-air tv are the things which bother me the most these days. If those ridiculous halo things are ever implemented, then you can add "the cars looking stupid" to the list too.

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  • 3 years ago

    yes

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