Any Good Dslr for a Beginner?

I m about to buy a Dslr camera is there any of you can give me a good and expert advice Thank you guys in advance :)

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  • 4 years ago
    Favorite Answer

    Since you are a beginner, i would suggest to buy an APS-C sensor camera. I would suggest buy a Canon or Nikon. They are very beginner friendly.

    Choose one of these -

    Canon 750D , Nikon D5500, Nikon D5300

    The first 2 have a touch screen which is convenient for focusing on objects on the LCD. If your budget is small then choose the Nikon D5300 which does not feature a touchscreen.

    Keep in mind that if you plan on doing more videography, then Canon is always a better choice.

    Also, since you are a beginner, i would suggest to get a DSLR+LENS KIT. If your budget is tight then select dslr + 18-55mm kit.

    You can also get a dslr +18-140mm(nikon) or 18-135mm(canon) lens kit if you need to zoom in more but this kit will cost you more.

    I would personally suggest to buy a nikon D5500+18-55mm kit for a beginner, assuming you no not require much videography.

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  • 4 years ago

    1. Nikon D3300

    It's not the most expensive entry-level DSLR, but we think it's the best

    Sensor: APS-C CMOS | Megapixels: 24.2 | Lens mount: Nikon DX | Screen: 3-inch fixed, 921,000 dots | Continuous shooting speed: 5fps | Max video resolution: 1080p | User level: Beginner

    2. Canon EOS 750D (Rebel T6i)

    A compelling combination of top-notch ergonomics and a superb sensor

    Sensor: APS-C CMOS | Megapixels: 24.2 | Lens mount: Canon EF-S | Screen: 3-inch articulating touch-screen, 1,040,000 dots | Continuous shooting speed: 5fps | Max video resolution: 1080p | User level: Beginner/enthusiast

    3. Nikon D5500

    Choosing between Canon and Nikon is tougher than ever

    Sensor: APS-C CMOS | Megapixels: 24.2 | Lens mount: Nikon DX | Screen: 3.2-inch articulating touch-screen, 1,040,000 dots | Continuous shooting speed: 5fps | Max video resolution: 1080p | User level: Beginner/enthusiast

    4. Nikon D5300

    No longer Nikon's latest and greatest entry-level DSLR, but almost

    Sensor: APS-C CMOS | Megapixels: 24.2 | Lens mount: Nikon DX | Screen: 3.2-inch, 1,037,000 dots | Continuous shooting speed: 5fps | Max video resolution: 1080p | User level: Beginner/enthusiast

    5. Canon EOS 700D (Rebel T5i)

    Still fresh on the outside, if a little long in the tooth within

    Sensor: APS-C CMOS | Megapixels: 18 | Lens mount: Canon EF-S | Screen: 3-inch articulating touch-screen, 1,040,000 dots | Continuous shooting speed: 5fps | Max video resolution: 1080p | User level: Beginner/enthusiast

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  • Anonymous
    4 years ago

    X

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  • 4 years ago

    no

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  • 4 years ago

    Do a lot of research, go visit a store that sells the cameras, hold them, see how they feel in your hands, compare features and prices, and then decide which is best for YOU. Nobody here can tell you which camera is best for YOU.

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  • Frank
    Lv 7
    4 years ago

    Be open to more than just Canon or Nikon. Pentax, for example, is ironically overlooked even though their lenses are just as good, if not better, than Nikon or Canon's. Their APS-C DSLRs offer features simply not found on Canon or Nikon, and they're better built, beating Canon and Nikon feature for feature.

    If you're going full frame, you should consider the Pentax K-1 which has the latest Sony 36MP sensor. The older version is currently being used in Nikon's D810. The new K-1 is a Nikon killer, especially when you consider the features such as in-body image stabilization, fully weather sealed, pixel shift, best dynamic range of any DSLR to date, and it's about $1,000 cheaper than the old D810.

    Keep in mind that you're not just buying a camera body, you're buying into a camera system. So you should be aware of the lenses that you need and may want in the future. This is where Canon and Nikon have an advantage. Both have a far larger selection of lenses that they make, and those made by 3rd party vendors, than what is available for the Pentax system.

    • Iridflare
      Lv 7
      4 years agoReport

      Fair comment about the lenses but it's worth noting that it's possible to use Pentax fit lenses going back decades. You can get good glass very cheaply.

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  • 4 years ago

    The cheaper ones are too annoyingly menu-driven, at mid-range you get some real dials and buttons that do specific jobs and viewfinders are less tunnel-like too.

    If going for the cheaper end then look at Pentax because they are almost as well specified as mid-range Canon 70D/Nikon 7*** series. You can fit Sigma and Tamron lenses on them too, just specify Pentax mount.

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  • keerok
    Lv 7
    4 years ago

    None.

    Entry-level does not refer to skill. It's about budget.

    All dSLRs are basically the same. The best you can do is buy the most expensive you can afford because the cheaper they are the more difficult it is to set them up. Avoid entry-level and jump to mid-level as much as possible for a satisfactory learning curve.

    If you can afford high-end, go for it. No one should stop you from doing so. With a dSLR that lasts a long time, whatever controls you don't need now, you will use later when you finally learn photography.

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  • Andrew
    Lv 7
    4 years ago

    Any of them really.

    Every photographer has a favourite manufacturer, so my recommendation of the Pentax K-50 (mid-level features at an entry-level price), should be seen on that basis, but it's a good camera that will serve you well.

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