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Types of foods that you can't find in Britiain, just America?

Hi! I'm sending a care package to my friend in England that's never been to America. I want to send food items that she's most likely never had before. I'm not thinking of sending any dairy/meat/etc. Or basically anything that can go bad. So far the only thing I know I'm sending for sure are graham crackers since I know she's never even heard of them. Any suggestions?

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  • 4 years ago
    Favorite Answer

    I have a rough idea (family owns a English village grocery store) + I also peruse assorted American grocery websites occasionally out of interest on the off-chance I might get to go to the USA eventually, so..........

    Twinkies....... were supposed to have been launched in the UK at least 6months ago, but I ain't seen the damn things anywhere yet.

    Don't think I've seen "Lucky Charms" cereal anywhere.

    We get "Hershey" bars in the UK now (though they're made in China rather than Pennsylvania).......... but we don't get the "Mr Goodbar", "milk duds" or "heath" bars (but do get Reeses pieces).... don't get "Almond joy" or "Mounds" either.

    We get Nestle Crunch bars widely available here, but not the "Babyruth" or "Butterfingers" or the "100 Grand" bars.

    Don't get the "3 Musketeers" bar.

    We don't get "A1 Steak Sauce" here, but the other famous American condiment's like "French's Mustard", "Sriracha chilli sauce", "Frank's Peppersauce" + "Sweet Baby Ray's" have started cropping up.

    Don't think we get "Chex mix" here, don't remember seeing anywhere.

    We definately don't get "Vernor's Ginger Soda" here (and it's apparently a sod to find in it's home nation as well come to think of it).... but get plenty of our own efforts at ginger flavoured carbonated soft drinks to choose from.

    Don't think I've seen Chocolate covered pretzels (e.g. Snyder's) anywhere in the UK, only plain old savoury ones.

    Can get Pancake mixes in the UK, but not "Aunt Jemima" or "Hungry Jack's" Pancake & Waffle mixes.

    We're overwhelmed with cans of baked beans from Heinz, Branston's + supermarket own label........... but don't get "Bush" brand ones that most American forums posters I've bumped into over the years claim are better than Heinz.... and it's only the past 5-10yrs that baked beans in the UK have gotten fancier than just plain old haricot beans in a cheap tomato sauce...... so something like "Bush Boston recipe beans" (a classic American dish).

    Get loads of different canned soups in the UK (mostly Heinz & Baxters)..... with Campbell's was available, sold it's UK business to the Batchelor's brand, but apparently coming back (even then only really saw their condensed soups)....... so perhaps throw in one of their Jambalya or clam chowder options from the US? There's also a "Bear creek gumbo soup mix" I've spotted on the walmart website.

    Haven't seen "Hunt's" ketchup here, almost totally dominated by Heinz.

    Beef jerky is available here...... but don't recall seeing "Bacon Jerky", "Turkey Jerky" or "Chicken Jerky" snack pouches.... and don't recall seeing beef jerky being any more ambitious than peppered.

    I spotted these spices from Texas on one of Billy Connolly's travel series:

    http://www.specialshit.com/products/

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  • Katie
    Lv 6
    4 years ago

    There aren't any - all large major supermarkets have at least 1 aisle and/or freezer section dedicated to foods from other countries. Within a 15 minute walk of where I'm sat now there are at least 10 independent shops that specialize in overseas food - 3 polish, 4 Chinese, 1 American and 1 Russian - and that is not including all the takeaways.

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  • Clive
    Lv 7
    4 years ago

    You can find just about anything in the UK if you look hard enough. Or a near substitute - graham crackers are very similar to our digestive biscuits. But not exactly the same. Maybe she could tell you which she likes best when she gets them?

    It's rather a point though - there are so many foods with different names that turn out to be the same thing! I say coriander, you say cilantro, I say crisps, you say potato chips... starts to remind me of that George Gershwin song "Let's Call the Whole Thing Off". "I like to-may-to, and you like to-mah-to..."

    You're right to avoid anything that isn't already cooked and packaged. Even if it doesn't go bad, Her Majesty's Customs will probably stop it. (They have a different procedure for inspecting imported raw food bought in by supermarkets, just as I'm sure US Customs does. The point is to stop foreign bugs getting into the country and upsetting the balance of nature.)

    Nice idea, though! Maybe think of things that are definitely all-American, and it'll still be nice for her to get them in AMERICAN packaging! One thing that does come to mind is confectionery and candies, because they do tend to be different. The formulation of chocolate is definitely different between our two countries - I've seen a TV programme where they tried out British and American chocolate on the public. Which do you like best? Only a few liked the American kind better, and guess what, they were visiting Americans! Just shows we like what we get used to.

    And I think of when my former church had an American minister, who of course liked to order things from home. She introduced the kids to candy canes. (She also introduced me to cornbread when she gave me dinner in return for helping out with her computer, but of course that's not a realistic option for you to send.)

    Greywolf reminds me of something my Dad occasionally ordered from the US at Christmas, so I KNOW this will get past Customs. It could even be what he's thinking of. https://www.collinstreet.com/online_bakery_gift/de... It's a very rich cake, so it's just as well it will last a long time! Just a small slice is enough at one time.

    • Eric4 years agoReport

      Can't find Distilled Water in Britain except through mailers

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  • 4 years ago

    We can get graham crackers in any supermarket.

    And we can get real Canadian maple syrup, which unlike yours isn't tasteless from being diluted with corn syrup. Try it some time.

    But there's one thing - when I was a kid, we used to get a care package from America every Christmas, ordered from Macy's in New York. It always had a really luxurious fruit and nut cake in it. Maybe you can still get that.

    UPDATE: it's not food, but Chiggeride is wonderful, and you can't get it in UK. And some of your Jungle Juice bug sprays are good - effective bug repellent is something we have trouble finding in UK.

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  • 4 years ago

    There aren't any. Graham crackers are indistinguishable from digestive biscuits, which everyone in Britain knows. It's just that they're not allowed to be called digestives in the USA.

    Food are now so sewn up by massive multinational corporations that sell their products in every country that there isn't anything you can send that she won't know.

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  • Anonymous
    4 years ago

    Graham crackers, really? Every supermarket ANYWHERE IN THE WORLD sells those!

    There are of course any number of *brands* that can only be found in the USA, but there are very few product categories. By which I mean, eg. Butterfinger is an American thing, but something similar exists under other names (and in any case, my local supermarket sells Butterfingers in their 'American aisle'). There are also all sorts of local/regional specialties such as salt water taffy, but your friend will not think that's particular American, just plain weird!

    In fact, having lived in both countries I'm really struggling to think of anything that you can get in the USA but not anywhere in the UK, at least anything that would be even remotely worth sending.

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  • 4 years ago

    Lucky charms are banned for sale as cereals here so you'll only find them in specialist candy stores. As others have said, the market of American goods is pretty accessible here.

    If I were you, I'd focus on regional products or products that you grew up with and the ones you love. Chances are, even if they're available, your friend won't have tried them all.

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  • 4 years ago

    Its a bit pointless really because most US foods are available here in the UK. A flavour combination that isn't available over here might be nice as it gives her an idea of the variety you have but you can even get Graham Crackers (we call them digestive biscuits) here in Asda

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  • Heike
    Lv 6
    4 years ago

    If I were you, I would not waste my cash on this. The UK is civilised enough to get lots of imported foodstuffs from the USA and elsewhere in the world. Having experienced foods on both sides of the Atlantic, I would say that some of the UK stuff tastes better.

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  • Anonymous
    4 years ago

    Bisonburger

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  • 4 years ago

    Cheese in a non-standard format (eg as a liquid, or in a spray can) won't be found in the UK.

    Most sweets are available in the UK, but special flavours / varieties (eg watermelon oreo cookies) aren't available.

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