You Wrong asked in SportsBaseball · 4 years ago

Jayson Werth-less, DC Scammer?

The Nationals are paying this loser $21,000,000 a year to impersonate a major league player. During the first 5 years of his contract Werth-less has averaged 119 games with a .272/16/60 line, and his game has sunk to a new low this year (.208 average, .265 OBP).

Why do teams insist on rewarding crappy players like Werth, Carl Crawford, the Upton Bros., Jose Reyes, Joe Mauer, Pablo Sandoval, Ryan Howard, and others?

4 Answers

Relevance
  • 4 years ago
    Best Answer

    The problem exists because there's always going to be a GM willing to overpay for a "name" player, and all the players you mentioned were "name" players at some point in their career.

    Brian Cashman of the NY Wankers has made a career out of overpaying has-beens, and most of the players you mentioned could also be described that way.

    There are scores of players who fail to produce after signing high-dollar, long-term contracts. They figure that they've already earned their money with their play in the years prior to the big money score, and they no longer have a reason to bust their butt to produce -- they get paid even if they suck.

    Justin Verlander, Sandoval, Mauer, Crawford, Jon Lester, CJ Wilson and Albert the Pooh would fall into this category -- good players who quit trying once they got paid.

    The thing about Werth is that he had four pretty good years in Philly but the Nats didn't need him because they had young players ready to step in and produce. Washington has improved since Werth joined the team even though his play has been sh!t.

  • 4 years ago

    That is because MLB contracts are 100% guaranteed. This is the drawback to signing a free agent to a big fat contract like the one Jayson Werth enjoys. He gets his money even if he becomes a .220/5 HR/30 RBI slappy.

  • Robert
    Lv 6
    4 years ago

    The same thing will happen when the Yankees sign Harper in 2 years.

  • 4 years ago

    cuz equality

Still have questions? Get your answers by asking now.