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Anonymous asked in Education & ReferenceWords & Wordplay · 4 years ago

Is it incorrect to say "more well-informed?"?

One of my professors told me it was grammatically correct to say "more well-informed," and another told me it was wrong. Which is it?

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  • Anonymous
    4 years ago
    Favorite Answer

    Normally the comparative of well is better so the answer that it should be "better informed" sounds, at first, like the correct answer and "more well-informed" would be ungrammatical making the first professor a dolt.

    But it is not so. "Well" is not used in its normal adverbial sense here, but it forms a complex adjective ("well-informed") whose comparative and superlatives do not follow the normal rule. A person can be "well-informed" as a state of being and can thus be "more well-informed" if that state is either increased or intensified.

    Think of it this way and you will probably understand immediately: Order a steak "well-done." What if it comes back rare? Are you going to send it back saying, "I would like that better-done?" Probably not. Instead, you will say, and correctly so, that you want it "more well-done."

    Sorry, but that's the case here, too.

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  • Anonymous
    4 years ago

    Yes, it's grammatically correct, but only adjectivally.

    "Well-informed" is an adjective, whereas "well informed," sans hyphen, is adverbial. Since we can discuss how well informed someone is, we know it is a matter of degrees, which means one can be more or less so. Since we would never say that John is "well-informeder" than Jake, we know we have to say it another way. As an adverb, the comparative version of "well" is "better," so one would say that John is "better informed" than Jake. Adjectivally, however, since "more-informed" is a compound word, we could appropriately say that John is a more well-informed student than Jake. That said, one might also just as well say John is a better-informed student than Jake.

    http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/well-inform...

    • dollhaus
      Lv 7
      4 years agoReport

      That's incredible.

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  • Mamie
    Lv 7
    4 years ago

    Better informed is probably preferable to more well informed.

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  • Pat
    Lv 7
    4 years ago

    BETTER informed

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