Herfot
Lv 6
Herfot asked in Business & FinanceInsurance · 5 years ago

I just got an really old medical bill and no longer have the same insurance. Can the insurance company be made to pay?

I just received a medical bill from October of 2014. The health insurance I had at the time was with the job I had. The company I worked for no longer exists and I have long since switched insurance providers. Is the old insurance company still on the hook for their part of the bill since it was incurred while I was still a member?

I don't know if the billing department screwed up. As there is no listing of adjustments for insurance nor who my insurance provider was.

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  • 5 years ago
    Favorite Answer

    Probably not. There is a time limit to submit bills - usually six months after services are provided, sometimes a bit longer. I've never seen one go as long as you need it to go.

    You should do some investigation, though - because if the provider was "in network", they ALSO have an obligation to submit the invoice to the insurance company in that time period - and if they don't, then they cannot collect from the insurance, and might not be able to collect from you.

    It's definately worth it to file the claim with the insurer at the time - at the very least, they'll send you an EOB denying coverage due to time lapse - but it might have info on there saying that the provider can't charge you either.

  • 5 years ago

    Maybe...the problem you are going to have is the age of the bill. Many insurance companies give you until the end of the next calendar year to file for reimbursement. If your old insurance company is like that, then no they will not cover the bill (you would have had to submit the bill by December 31, 2015). All you can do is submit the bill and hope. If they don't cover due to age of the bill, there is nothing you can do to force them to pay and it will all be on you. Also note that it is your obligation, not the service provider's obligation to ensure that all bills are submitted properly, so there is no action you can take against the doctor either.

  • 5 years ago

    Kinda depends on who is responsible for the screw up. The old insurance company isn't going to pay a claim that old. So, if you ignored previous bills by the medical provider and/or never got them the proper insurance information, then the whole bill is on you. If it was me, and the provider just completely failed to bill the insurance company, then I would inform them that I will only be paying them what I would have owed had they not dropped the ball.

  • 5 years ago

    No.

    Insurance can be made to pay a bill even if you no longer have the insurance.

    But insurance cannot be made to pay a bill that is over a year old -- even if you do still have the insurance.

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  • ?
    Lv 7
    5 years ago

    You failed to pay the bill in 2014. If you had insurance at the time, why didnt you tell the provider to submit that bill to them? Something is not quite right here. Yes, the old insurance would have to pay their share but you have to pay your share. If the provider cant get it from insurance, you agreed to pay the whole thing when you became a patient there. So make a repayment plan, and if you cant find the insurance people, sue them.

  • Anonymous
    5 years ago

    Most insurance companies have a "deadline" (typically one year) for the provider to file a claim. If this bill is for a service that was covered under your insurance at all, the question you should be asking the provider is WHY they failed to file a claim with your insurer.

    Surely, you knew (or should have known) that billing for these services was pending. You could have saved yourself the current problem by following up with the provider at that time.

  • ?
    Lv 7
    5 years ago

    Depends on the date of the bill and if you were insured at that time.

  • 5 years ago

    Contact the insurance company you had at the time. If you don't remember, then you could have some trouble here.

  • Bill
    Lv 7
    5 years ago

    They may be unless there is a time limit on submitting claims. All you can do is submit it for consideration submission .

  • Dan B
    Lv 7
    5 years ago

    Yes they are. But making them pay might be a challenge (shouldn't be though).

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