TS
Lv 7
TS asked in Politics & GovernmentPolitics · 5 years ago

How soon will the day come, when being born in America doesn't guarantee citizenship?

Will congess fix this loophole being exploited by illegal immigrants?.............illegals who birthed children in the US........

If this happens how long before the generational unemployed be deem not worthy of citizenship?

Do you think immigrants shoulds have a job, speak English, and/or attend school prior to becoming a US citizen?

6 Answers

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  • Clive
    Lv 7
    5 years ago
    Favorite Answer

    The trouble is that it's in the constitution, so you need a 2/3 vote in both Houses of Congress and the agreement of 3/4 of the states to change it. It will have to wait until someone thinks it's important enough to battle to change the 14th Amendment.

    We in the UK don't have a written constitution that says this, so Parliament can just change it - and it did in 1981, to state that birth is not enough, at least one parent must have permanent residence in the UK or the kid is not British. The US is hamstrung by having written it into the constitution.

    Which is a good general point with constitutions - as the whole point of having one is to make it hard to change, so no potential dictator can just do it at their own whim, it shouldn't contain any more than it really needs to. Germany calls theirs the Grundgesetz, which means "Basic Law" - that's exactly what it should be, just what you absolutely need and no more. The US constitution is actually quite close to that, which is why it has survived so long, but this is one of the points that is well worth a rethink as it's an obvious problem.

    LOL - I used to be Treasurer of a choral society and that stated in its constitution that there are 11 members of the committee and 8 of those are named posts. We found it difficult to fill some of those, such as Social Secretary. But does that REALLY need to be someone on the committee? No it doesn't. We might have someone who doesn't mind organising social events, but doesn't want to come to committee meetings. So I drew up an amendment to say that the committee consists of the Chairman, the Secretary, the Treasurer, and 8 others. Those three are all any club absolutely needs - a chairman to be in overall charge, a secretary to take meeting notes and write letters, and a treasurer to look after the money. I got that through a General Meeting, and the Charity Commission (it's a registered charity) wrote back when I sent them the amended constitution to say this is a good move! And now the society can arrange things more informally just as suits who wants to do what.

    There is another side to this. I answered a question a while ago from a Briton who just happens to have US citizenship as well because his parents happened to be there at the time. Now he's of adult age, this is causing problems because thanks to FATCA, no British bank will let him have a bank account, and he has to file tax returns with the IRS even though he has nothing whatsoever to do with the US. And the US requires payment of $2.350 for him to renounce US citizenship, which he never wanted in the first place.

    It wouldn't be right to deprive people of citizenship who already have it. Retrospective legislation is never a good idea, as then nobody can be sure of what the law is. What if you do something today, that gets made illegal retrospectively in 5 years' time? Nobody would ever be sure of what they can do. So don't do that, and the problem won't be solved immediately, but it will be in a generation or so.

    On your last question, absolutely yes. The UK pretty much does that - you can come, but unless you're a genuine refugee you won't get any social security until after a long while, so you'd better get a job, and after 5 years you can't stay unless you successfully apply for ILR (Indefinite Leave to Remain). That requires passing an English test and a citizenship test. As far as I know, the US does pretty much the same thing.

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  • Jeff D
    Lv 7
    5 years ago

    US citizenship should involve more than just being born here. The nationality of your parents, for example, should be a factor.

    Birthright citizenship is something of an anachronism in the modern world. The United States and Canada are the only developed nations in the world that still offer birthright citizenship to tourists and illegal aliens.

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  • Frank
    Lv 7
    5 years ago

    The Fourteenth Amendment guaranteeing citizenship to someone born in the United States will not be changed.

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  • 5 years ago

    Yeah the anchor baby syndrome,,,,,,allows people to enter the country illegally just to have a baby at tax payer expense. No penalty for breaking immigration laws. No background checks. No immunizations.

    This guarantees the baby is a US citizen and allows the parents and family members to remain in the USA.

    Collecting government benefits including obamacare and public education, SS, at tax payer expense as long as they promise to vote for democrats.

    Yeah that constitutional amendment will never go away.

    I do think immigrants should have a job, speak English, and/or attend school prior to becoming a US citizen as long as they are legally trying to become citizens.

    Once they fail a requirement or to appear, they are deported.

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  • Anonymous
    5 years ago

    Let's make it retroactive. Then most of us wouldn't be citizens because most of our ancestors arrived here without any visas or permission- they just landed here and stayed.

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  • Anonymous
    5 years ago

    dont allow any immigrants at all.

    how do they advance the US national interest?

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