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I need to interview a person who has at least graduated high school during the 1960s?

here are the questions:

1. How old were you when you graduated high school?

2. Where have lived during the 1960's?

3. What was your occupation at that time?

4. What was your marital and family status during the 1960s?

5. When you look back at that time period, what strikes you as being the most important or significant events, trends, or ideas of the time?

6. What was like to live then? What did you do for entertainment? What kinds of music and movies did you listen or see? What were your favorite foods/snacks? What were the fashion styles for men and women?

7. The 1980s was often called the time of the Yuppie or the Me Decade, how would you characterize the 1960s as a time?

8. What differences do you notice about that time period compared to today?

9. What were the things that you enjoyed to do, but are not around today?

10. What did you think about the women's liberation movement?

11. How did you feel about women in the workplace? Did you go with it or against it? Why?

Update:

and i need your name too

2 Answers

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  • ?
    Lv 7
    6 years ago
    Favorite Answer

    1. How old were you when you graduated high school?

    I was graduated in 1966 from Lamar HS in Houston, Texas, at the age of 17.

    2. Where have lived during the 1960's?

    Houston, Texas, and Austin, Texas.

    3. What was your occupation at that time?

    Student. In high school I worked in an ice cream parlor. In college I

    worked as a computer operator, first in a bank, then for an association of electric coops, and then free lance for companies doing seasonal work on local tax rolls.

    4. What was your marital and family status during the 1960s?

    I was single. I lived with my mother, younger brother, and grandmother in Houston, and then with various roommates in apartments and housing cooperatives around the University of Texas (now "at Austin").

    5. When you look back at that time period, what strikes you as being the most important or significant events, trends, or ideas of the time?

    Civil rights and the war.

    6. What was like to live then?

    It seemed as if it would be possible, if dangerous and difficult, to change the world for the better.

    What did you do for entertainment?

    I played a lot of bridge -- which was especially popular among people of all ages. Other card games were also very popular, and besides being played in homes, were played in "studios" which were just commercial venues with many folding tables and chairs. I also went to many movies. Movies were cheap, and since there were no cellphones and people did not bring small infants to movies, they were very enjoyable. We went bowling and played miniature golf -- there were many new venues for both which were not sleazy or rundown. And of course there was TV. This was a golden age for TV. Many shows had nearly 40 new episodes a year, instead of the 13 or so now. Yeah some of them look pretty cheesy now. By the end of the 60s many people I knew had largely organized their lives around marijuana. I did not like it, but I knew how to roll (from rolling tobacco) so I spent many boring hours with very stoned people who fortunately being very stoned were easy to amuse. I was into sex, lots and lots of sex with lots of people, but fortunately in those days that was not a very time-consuming pursuit.

    What kinds of music and movies did you listen or see?

    I and my friends listened to many instrumentals. Rock and roll was everywhere, but it was pretty simple stuff -- nothing deep or dark. I saw man foreign films, Hitchcock, Bond films, and "serious" films like To Kill a Mockingbird." We often went to blood-and-gore or really bad monster films at drive-ins.

    What were your favorite foods/snacks?

    Pretty much everything was hamburgers and malteds.

    What were the fashion styles for men and women?

    I did not realize it so much at the time, but looking at photos of events I participated in, I am surprised at how many young women were in dresses and how many young men wore slacks and collar shirts. There was lots of madras in casual wear, but there still was a big divide between casual and normal street wear. You wouldn't see much casual in class, downtown, or in stores. You'd see it at the beach, barbecues, and recreational venues. Jeans and Ts everywhere on everyone did not come along until the 70s.

    7. The 1980s was often called the time of the Yuppie or the Me Decade, how would you characterize the 1960s as a time?

    The 60s was a time for activism.

    8. What differences do you notice about that time period compared to today?

    There was a lot more freedom and spontaneity in the 60s. People had their own ideas. I'd say there was a lot less groupthink and a lot more group action.

    9. What were the things that you enjoyed to do, but are not around today?

    I think I mentioned such things a miniature golf, bowling, drive-ins, card parlors. Some of those things are sort of around today, but mostly they are either extremely sleazy or extremely swank and artificial (like a theme park). There were fast food franchises, but a step up from that were many interesting, affordable local restaurants -- not the cookie cutter Chili's, Bennigans, Olive Gardens of today which are totally devoid of character. I guess I am saying there was much more middle ground. more stuff and a bigger variety of stuff between the slums and mansions. And, oh, yeah, I miss being able to get lost and be alone, being able to get off the grid. I remember in the late 60s, between bouts of love on a local make out spot on a "mountain" remarking to my companion what a horrible thing it would be if you couldn't get away from telephones.

    10. What did you think about the women's liberation movement?

    I was very enthusiastic. I thought it would be possible to avoid the world we now live in (2015) if women could have meaningful, satisfying roles in the world as something other than babies machines. Of course I was wrong as the "have it all" (meaning having a career AND babies) thing came along, and the hope of controlling population evaporated.

    11. How did you feel about women in the workplace? Did you go with it or against it? Why?

    Sure. I mean that was part of the program right? If they are at work, they aren't making babies, right? Mainly, I never saw why anyone would object. I did kind of have trouble with the management style of some women -- the boss who would say "would you do me the favor of rechecking these figures <eyelash batting>." I hated that. I'd much prefer bosses who could give direct orders: "Recheck these figures."

    --Lars Eighner.

  • ?
    Lv 7
    6 years ago

    Send us your personal email address. I dont want to post my personal history here.

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