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Anonymous asked in Food & DrinkVegetarian & Vegan · 5 years ago

Why do so many people think they're experts on nutrition?

Seems like everyone has something to say about nutrition. Just because you're eating every day, it doesn't make you an expert.

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  • ?
    Lv 7
    5 years ago
    Favorite Answer

    "Why do so many people think they're experts on nutrition?"

    Some read a few books, and/or articles online, and and then they think that makes them an expert. This also goes for those who practice a specific type of dietary nutrition,n they see themselves somehow as being qualified experts, but aren't. More often as not, and not intentionally giving out advice, that maybe wrong, or even detrimental to the health of someone else.

    In fact there are very few true expert on Yahoo Answers, with a few exceptions, ad this isn't just true for nutrition, but any of the various sundry topics/categories. People can say that they have a degree in this or that subject online, but unless they put up some form of documentation, there's no way to know if they really hold a degree.

    I'm by no means an expert. However I have learned a small amount over the course of my life. It's that which I'll share, where a question comes up. But that by no means qualifies me as an expert on nutrition, nor anyone else unless they hold at minimum in my opinion a Masters Bachelor of Arts degree, in nutrition. Even then that means nothing if one allows personal feeling, and/or an agenda to promote, then that gets in the way of a valid answer.

    Then there are those who harvest "facts," that supports their point of view, and try to come off as experts. I won't claim that, even within what falls well within my realm of knowledge of music, and more specifically the history of Country and Western music, with more than fourty six years, of private pursuit, on the the subject. Sometimes I use that knowledge to tie in with diet and nutrition, but only wherein it is useful, and serves to give a useful answer.

    The acquisition of knowledge is a wonderful thing. However a little knowledge can also make it dangerous, used wrongly. This is why even some who qualify as experts, refuse to accept the title of being an expert fully. As they know that the more they know, there is far more they don't know.

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  • Tim
    Lv 7
    5 years ago

    Because nutrition is a soft science. In order to claim to be an expert in something like, for instance, mathematics, you actually have to be able to DO the math. With nutrition you just have to make a claim and shout loud enough. It's very easy to sound like an expert and even easier to get others to believe you since they know even less.

    EDIT: OK, maybe that was a bit harsh. With the soft sciences things change constantly. New information is gained, old ideas discarded or modified. By the time you gather the data, crunch the statistics, and publish the paper you're already out of date. Something like Math on the other hand, hasn’t changed in a while. There really isn't a whole lot happening in the last couple of centuries. To get your PhD in Math you basically say "Hey look at this. I have an equation with no internal contradictions." The Board of Review looks at it and says "Yup, you're right. No contradictions there. Here's your diploma."

    EDIT AGAIN: You know what would make a really interesting study? See if there's a correlation between the 'health benefits' of a fad food and the stock market futures price. Is there a relationship between a food being really 'good' for you and a year that's a bumper harvest? Does a food suddenly become 'bad' for you if the crop was poor? Are we manipulated to buy certain foods based on the supply?

    • Wendigo
      Lv 7
      5 years agoReport

      Precisely, and concisely said.

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  • 5 years ago

    Most people don't feel they are "experts", but have a bit more education and common sense than some of what passes for information on the internet. Those who do feel they are "experts", are often woefully ill informed by propaganda. You can recognize them because they are strident and ridicule those in the majority who disagree with them. One person posted a link to nutritional information that was over 100 years old as if it were cutting edge research. This person is also quick to belittle and ridicule others, so you have to believe that their aggression is designed to force a person to accept their propaganda, just to avoid further unpleasant encounters. Don't fall for it. The hostility doesn't end.

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  • ?
    Lv 6
    5 years ago

    It's just a facet of the good and evils of human nature. Whilst humans can be accepting of new info, there are some that are locked into their own opinions and brush off any contradictions as invalid.

    In this case, these people whom you're talking about, their opinion is that x food is sexnificent, and that y food causes cancer and die-abetes. And they think they're right.

    Some humans are like that. It's that simple.

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  • 5 years ago

    I don't know what people 'think', nor have I heard anyone claim to be experts. I think a lot of people are intelligent and often research the question asked before posting an informative answer.

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  • 5 years ago

    Some people actually took classes, some are trained dietitians, some are trained chefs, some have degrees in nutrition, some have decades of experience preparing and serving meals (be it for families or in a larger capacity), some are self taught because the information is readily available on the Internet. Some of us in this forum fall into more than one of these categories.

    Some people however, are merely parroting an opinion without any research or knowledge base to back up their assertions. Parrots have a very limited vocabulary. After a while it is boring to listen to the same 9 words over and over.

  • solo
    Lv 5
    5 years ago

    It's quite an interesting pseudo-science, isn't it? The problem is, there are so many factors to consider when you try to work out which foods are supposed to be good and bad for a person.

    • Wendigo
      Lv 7
      5 years agoReport

      I wouldn't call it all pseudo science. However there is quite bit of pseudo science, on nutrition, as well as unfounded, and either myth based, old wives tales, or is a form of urban myth. But I gave a thumbs up in general.

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  • 5 years ago

    I know all about healthy eating, but don't consider myself an expert

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  • Anonymous
    5 years ago

    i feel i know much considering... my situation... (among others that i KNOW and have long term studies with )

    i have inherited malignant hypertension among other things. and i use information and experience to utilize the most out of my ability when i consume and compare.

    re: raw vegetarianism works best for ME. considering also i suffer from arteriosclerosis and take medications for my MH.

    nutritional properties are as unique as the person, one must investigate their needs (and wants of course) when wanting to improve their conditions through a diet plan.

    research IS everything.

    • Wendigo
      Lv 7
      5 years agoReport

      Research is not "everything," without practical application, research has no value. Even then what is applicable in many situations, is not always so in every instances. There is one rule here, that is there are and will always be exceptions.

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  • Anonymous
    5 years ago

    These experts seem to crawl out of the woodwork upon encountering someone vegan. "Oh, what about protein?" "Oh, what about iron?," they squeal.

    Most consider folklore and legends passed down over generations and drilled into them with billion dollar marketing ads by animal industries to be hard-core established facts.

    Milk - it does a body good. - does not.

    Beef - it's what's for dinner - nope, not my dinner.

    Source(s): "Where do you get your protein?," or so goes the clueless chant.
    • ...Show all comments
    • Lv 5
      5 years agoReport

      Nice to see you again, shanainka bytch! Yeah, you're right, it often is. But it is also often is just a prelude followed by a warning / advice / patronizing encouragement for choosing "protein-rich" food. It gets tiring.

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