Can Seniors Build and Live in Tiny Houses for the rest of their lives?

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  • 5 years ago
    Favorite Answer

    Absolutely, they can (I say this from experience and real seniors I know who do this). I know a neighbor who sold his suburban home at the age of 67 to build a tiny house for himself measuring a little less than 500 sq ft (the typical upper limit for a small home). That house lasted him till the age of 82.

    His son built his own version of a small house when he was 29. He's now in his 50s and plans to keep that tiny space for his own post-retirement "man cave".

    Building and living in a tiny house is a voluntary choice irrespective of age or seniority. If you can make do with a smaller-than-usual space, you save on utility bills including heating, cooking & cooling costs.

    Most modern tiny homes I've built across my lifetime have ranged from "real tiny" ones (120 sq ft) build out of a trailer or shipping container, going up to "almost full-sized" homes measuring 800-900 sq ft.

    All of them had plumbing, running water, furniture, bed, medical supplies and internet. A few of them had wheels too.

    + Tiny House Info: http://tinyhouse.ellsed.com

    • Gatlin
      Lv 4
      5 years agoReport

      This is what I wanted to know. Thanks for sharing your practical experience.

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  • 4 years ago

    I disagree with Lynn's comment that remotes don't change much. It took me a long time to master our new one some years ago and then, when visiting Mum I could not understand hers at all and she became exasperated with me because 'SHE knew how it worked and was much older than I am'. My 'younger' brain should have been able to work it out she thought but I never did. I now live without T.V. but, when visiting relatives who still have one, the remotes are a mystery to me. I'm just thankful that I don't have the desire to have a T.V. any more. Just ensure that the person who you will be helping understands how to use the one bought. Don't leave assuming that all is well because the person might become very upset later when realising that the information had not been retained. You might receive a few phone calls on this so be prepared.

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  • Anonymous
    4 years ago

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  • Anonymous
    5 years ago

    Yes.

    I live in a one bedroom bungalow in a retirement complex.

    The bungalows are normal size not tiny, but simply have

    less rooms than larger homes. They were built especially

    for Seniors and have pull cords and an intercom giving

    access to the scheme manager.

    I have normal size living room, double bedroom, bathroom

    which is a "wet room" and kitchen which takes all of the

    usual appliances.

    So Seniors already live in smaller homes but not necessarily

    tiny. Tiny seems very claustrophobic to my mind.

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  • P.L.
    Lv 6
    5 years ago

    Not for this senior citizen. They seem FAR TOO small for safety. Older people often need walkers, crutches or sticks and some need wheelchairs and other aids which take up much room. I have a small two bedroomed house with bathroom and two rooms plus small kitchen downstairs. I don't think I could cope in anything much smaller than this really. In addition I am slightly claustrophobic so that has to be taken into account also. I've seen some very small, claustrophobic rooms in old people's homes which I would never wish to be consigned to either.

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  • 5 years ago

    what age are we talking here? and how tiny a house and where? Lots of seniors get low benefits that can't even pay for their rent so how would they be able to have a house since there is home insurance and flood insurance to pay and taxes all of which keep rising. Then who would fix the roof or maintain the home? It's not just about the house itself but the things a homeowner has to pay for that would make this idea prohibitive.

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  • E. M
    Lv 5
    5 years ago

    I have a small house but not a miniscule one. I moved from a much larger one a few years ago bringing with me many things I have not used since so now is the time to clear out a lot of stuff and live tidily for the first time in my life. It's hard to part with things but if these 'things' have been in boxes for a few years I, obviously, don't really need them. I'm determined now to sort out a box per week and, if there is nowhere suitable for each item to go (other than another box), then it will go to a charity shop.

    Even with far less stuff though I would not want to live in a house like the one shown in the link given.

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  • Anonymous
    5 years ago

    The NEW "tiny houses" .. the ones that are like 200 sq.ft on the first floor .. depend on ladder or off-set stairs. Seniors get weak, many have trouble with balance, many days when they are not well. They need a structure that is all on one level.

    Tiny Houses are not an option.

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  • 5 years ago

    No, the tiny houses I have seen have too much climbing for old age. I have lived in small places before like a 16ft trailer for 4 people and it was too small, no bathroom. A 26ft trailer is big enough for two people but couldn't handle a walker or wheel chair. The bed would only have enough room on each side to walk sideways, hard to make the bed. A raised bed like a camper on a pick up truck is hard to climb in when young and short and very difficult to change the sheets.

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  • 5 years ago

    Of course they can and even more by saving money; I for instance; sold my house and just lived in a senjior apartment assistant living for under 400 per month with gas and electric included.

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  • 5 years ago

    LOL, I could, easily. I have lived in efficiency units and not used all the space. My husband is a borderline hoarder, though, and even though we've gotten rid of a lot of his stuff, we're still working on it. It was enough just to get most of it out of the house.

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