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Do the spainards born and raised in america speak a spanish that is different from the spanish spoken by people born and raised in spain?

I'm asking because my mothers side of the family are spainards, and I never spoke a word of spanish. So i decided to learn the spanish from my heritage, but I notice spain spanish is different from my families spanish. My great grandmother was born in 1897 In Texas. So I started thinking they might be speaking some type of old spain spainsh that is now different in spain. I notice that spain spanish has alot of words that are used in latin america, but a small group of words are different and they use vosotros. for examle I learned Barco is boat in spanish but in spain a boat is a Bote. In spain they use Judias for beans but My grandmother always used Frijoles in reference to beans. In spain they use patata for potatoes, but my grandmother called potatoes Papas. The same word used by latin americans. I wonder if the spainards from america speak a different spanish from the ones actually born and raised in spain. My grandmother uses the word Pelota for a dustpan, but in my spanish book, I read pelota was a type of shovel. My grandmother used Bola for a bump or Bolita for a little bump like a pimple type bumb. the spanish book I have has Bola being used in reference to a Ball. Why is there a difference in the spanish that is spoken. I just assumed all spainards weather born and raised in america or spain spoke the same spanish. I worked with a guy that was a spainard, and his spanish appeared to be similar to my families from what I can tell. any explanation for the difference?

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  • 6 years ago
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    "Official" Spanish is that of Castilla la Vieja (Old Castille) province of north central Spain, whereas the Spanish of southern Spain has more Arab and Gipsy influence.. A majority of early settlers in the Americas came from southern Spain, particularly from the poorer areas of the S.W. such as Estremadura, and almost all migrants sailed from Seville, so making the accents from these two areas predominate. During the long voyage many migrants also picked up bits of the Spanish used by sailors. And the migration began in 1492 and has continued more or less ever since, with each successive generation of migrants bringing in the Spanish of their time. The last big influx was that of refugees from the Spanish Civil War who went mostly to Mexico, Argentina and Chile. Latin American Spanish was also affected by the languages of the native populations, e,g, Nahuatl (Aztec) speakers in Mexico, but particularly ibu Guarani speakers in Paraguay. Many words for New World plants and animals came from Arawak, but others from Carib, which has created a number of differences. Spanish was also affected by the languages of other immigrants (Africans to the west coast of Colombia, and to Cuba, Italians to Venezuela and Argentina, Portuguese speakers in Uruguay, Basques in Chile. and American English in the American southwest. "Voceo" (the sixteenth century custom of using "vos" for "tu") is found in isolated regions from Central America to Argentina. The Spanish of the High Andes tends to be more conservative than that spoken in and around the Caribbean. Spanish computerese varies according to the accident of who did the first translations of computer manuals in each individual republic. Other terms for other modern inventions or customs, e.g. the word for a bus, vary widely over the whole Spanish speaking world. All in all the degree of difference between different Spanish speaking countries is like the differences in the types of English spoken in the various countries of British settlement (the US, Canada, the Caribbean, South Africa, India, Australia and New Zealand, etc. ,

    Source(s): Beinr born in the UK and learning Castillian Spanish, then moving to the US and having professional dealings with almost every Spanish speaking Republic, and with the Portuguese of Brazil.
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  • Esther
    Lv 5
    6 years ago

    I think in every language it must happen the same, because even when it's the same language there are differences depending on the country or even the area. For example English from US is different from English from UK, but even in UK there are differences among Scottish, Welsh, English,...

    In Spanish it happens the same thing, there are differences among Spanish from Spain and Latin American Spanish, but there are differences among Mexican and Peruvian, Argentinian,...and even in Spain there are differences among Andalucians, Galicians, Vasques, ...Although we understand every of them perfectly and talk among us without any problem, out of the curiosity of some especific words.

    So you can not learn every variety, but if you learn Spanish, you'll be able to communicate perfectly with any Spanish speaking people.

    This is a funny video about the different accents when talking Spanish (although it includes foreign language speakers too):

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MqHS7oxiOW0

    Youtube thumbnail

    Source(s): I'm from Spain
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  • Anonymous
    6 years ago

    Yes of course there are differences. Just as how we, in the UK, speak English slightly differently to how you would speak in the USA. The language is largely similar, but there are small differences in common every day usage; the word 'billete' is used for ticket in Spain, whereas in parts of Latin America 'boleto' would be used instead, although generally they mean the same thing.

    Source(s): Una estudiante del español.
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  • Anonymous
    6 years ago

    Spanish speak Castilian. Every country influenced by Spain speak it a lil different from one another but still understand each other.***mexicans who live along the border of the US have words used only along the border, its Spanish and English mixed, Spanglish, for example they say carro for car but the interior of Mexico wouldnt know what that is.

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  • 6 years ago

    your family was possibly influenced by the mexican variation of spanish since mexicans represent the largest number of spanish speakers in texas. you say your grandmother was born there in 1897, it seems unlikely that they wouldn't have absorbed some of the local language over that span of time.

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    • My grandmother also used the word Ronoso which was used to mean a dirty person. She used Asco in reference to a disgusting person or thing. she used Cojinas as the word for cushions. She called a car a coche. She used a word that sounded like they were saying Mula in reference to Money.

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  • Anonymous
    6 years ago

    if a person is born in america how is it that they are spaniards? im confused here. if you ever meet a born and raised spaniard in america please let me know because ive never met one before.

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    • People in spain might identify themselves as spaniards, but another term is spanish. The ones in america state they are of spanish descent, and it is understood that they are spaniards born and raised in america. The ones from america that speak the language speak it different from people in spain.

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