Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Politics & GovernmentPolitics · 6 years ago

What is Marbury vs Madison?

Update:

why was it important

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  • 6 years ago
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    Marbury v. Madison, 5 U.S. 137 (1803), was a landmark United States Supreme Court case in which the Court formed the basis for the exercise of judicial review in the United States under Article III of the Constitution. The landmark decision helped define the boundary between the constitutionally separate executive and judicial branches of the American form of government.

    The case resulted from a petition to the Supreme Court by William Marbury, who had been appointed Justice of the Peace in the District of Columbia by President John Adams but whose commission was not subsequently delivered. Marbury petitioned the Supreme Court to force the new Secretary of State James Madison to deliver the documents. The Court, with John Marshall as Chief Justice, found firstly that Madison's refusal to deliver the commission was both illegal and remediable. Nonetheless, the Court stopped short of compelling Madison (by writ of mandamus) to hand over Marbury's commission, instead holding that the provision of the Judiciary Act of 1789 that enabled Marbury to bring his claim to the Supreme Court was itself unconstitutional, since it purported to extend the Court's original jurisdiction beyond that which Article III established. The petition was therefore denied.

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  • 6 years ago

    You haven't learned to use Google? Honestly, just google it.

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  • Anonymous
    6 years ago

    Here come the judge.Hey ya'll ,Here come the judge.

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  • Jack
    Lv 5
    6 years ago

    Not important enough to know about!

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