Bridget asked in PetsDogs · 6 years ago

Rehoming a dog with issues?

Do NOT tell me to put him down, because that is NOT going to happen. I have a Newfoundland mix, Link, and he is dog aggressive. I believe that his aggression stems from fear. Unfortunately, he does also have a bite history. Just once and just after we first got him, mind you, and he was cornered and scared at the time, but he still bit. I strongly feel that he is not a lost cause, because he is in a much better place than he was when he first came to us. However, he needs someone who is experienced and able to work with him. He is very energetic and sweet, but I just think that he is more than I can handle at the moment. It really breaks my heart to even consider this. Has anyone had any experience rehoming "problem" dogs? Is there a route that I can take to make sure he ends up in a good home? Thank you.

Update:

Thank you everyone. I think I'm going to just keep him. He isn't an immediate danger to the family, and with his issues, there aren't many other choices. I'm just going to work with him.

7 Answers

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  • 6 years ago
    Favorite Answer

    Newfoundland rescue only takes PB dogs and they won't take a dog with a bite record. Sorry about that, I understand you are trying to find a solution for your dog. He doesn't sound really dangerous - did I read a long time ago that he is also part Border Collie? Contact this rescue: http://www.newfrescue.com/newfmixes.htm There is a Yahoo group, as well.

    True story: I am involved with a group of Newfoundland dog people from a Newfoundland forum. One individual had a rescue that she was working with, she took the dog to a dog show as she had been entered in obedience. The dog went nuts at the show, he had never been subjected to that kind of stimulation, he was lunging and growling at other dogs, people were afraid of the dog. She learned that he was dog aggressive at that show, she was so upset by that revelation. She was determined to overcome the aggression because she loved her dog. Fast forward to one year later, she returned with the dog to the very same dog show and he earned the first two legs toward his title. No one could believe it was the same dog, and I had a close friend that was at both shows, she couldn't believe the difference in the dog & praised her publicly for her work.

    How did she do it? She bought the book Control Unleashed and read it cover to cover. She got up every day at 6 AM and started walking this dog out in public using the tools she read about in the book. 6 AM because there aren't a lot of dogs out walking at that time, so she was able to begin desensitizing him to just a few random dogs. As he started to improve, the walks became later and later in the morning so that there were more dogs around. It's called Look At That (or LAT), a technique that Leslie McDevitt developed to desensitize fearful dogs. http://www.controlunleashed.net/book.html If you feel your dog could benefit from LAT, it is worth the $20 to give it a try.

  • 6 years ago

    I am with rottweiler rescue. What you do have to understand is that finding people with enough experience that want the challenge or have the place for a dog which needs work is very very hard.

    There are not hundreds of people out there just waiting for the next problem dog to come in so that they can help. Most people who can or are willing to deal with a problem dog usually have one already.

    Don't pass this dog on unless you are sure of who he is going to

  • 6 years ago

    Why don't you take him to a Newfoundland Rescue? There will be people there that have experience with the breed & know the best ways to deal with them - and they'll also probably find a home for him with people who are also experienced with the breed, or experienced in dealing with dog-aggressive dogs. If a dog is dog aggressive, it isn't the end of the world - but it's a tough hurdle to get over, so don't re-home him to just anybody. I'd definitely go for a rescue!

  • 6 years ago

    Surrender him to a Newfie rescue - they will evaluate his temperament, get him any training he needs in a foster home, and place him in a suitable, approved home.

    DO let them know his bite history ... as they need to be fully aware of the situation with the dog.

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  • JenVT
    Lv 7
    6 years ago

    If he is dog aggressive the simple solution is to keep him away from other dogs. I have two dog aggressive dogs that have to be kept at home and segregated from each other. This is standard operating procedure at my house and quite frankly, I would never rehome them because I don't trust other people to be as vigilant as I am.

    If he is aggressive to humans then you cannot re-home him in good conscience. If you can't manage him then you surely can't expect someone else to at risk to themselves. The reality is that not all dogs can be "saved" and it's much kinder to have a human that loves him by his side when he is PTS than have him put down as a vicious dog in an animal control facility. If he is aggressive to humans, I'm afraid that is his future.

    I would have a long conversation with someone at the Newfie breed rescue. They can give you insight and advice.

    http://www.ncarescue.org/

    • Bridget
      Lv 5
      6 years agoReport

      Thank you. I will talk to the Newfie rescue. He is not human aggressive. He lashed out once in fear, and that's where I'm running into issues. That's the reason why he needs an experienced home.

  • 6 years ago

    I had a dog who was food aggressive, and especially with dogs, she never bit a human, but she would constantly attack our other dogs if they went to near to "Her" food. We had to rehome her, because she was out of control, and to much for us (She was a Lab/coon hound mix) I refused to take her to humane society because I was afraid she'd be put down because of her aggression. So we tried to train her out of it, she wasn't food aggressive with people anymore, just dogs. Humane societies won't put a dog down just because it doesn't get a long with other dogs, they will just rehome them to people who don't have any other dogs.

    But, you say your dog bites? They will put a dog down for biting people... even fear biting. So your best bet is to keep him, or try to find someone who is willing to work with an aggressive dog. Because if you do take him to a shelter or a pound, he will more than likely be put down.

    • Bridget
      Lv 5
      6 years agoReport

      He's not a chronic biter, even in situation where he is afraid he would rather run away, but he has a bite history due to some unfortunate circumstance. He was cornered by someone who he was deeply afraid of, and the person reached out to grab him by the collar.

  • Anonymous
    6 years ago

    I know people who have asked farmers in the area dog gets lots of land to run a nice home usually away from crowds

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